Cover image for Objects of my affection : a novel
Title:
Objects of my affection : a novel
Author:
Smolinski, Jill.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Simon & Schuster, [2012]

©2012
Physical Description:
310 pages ; 25 cm
General Note:
"A Touchstone book."
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781451660753

9781451660777

9781451660784
Format :
Book

Available:*

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On Order

Summary

Summary

In the humorous, heartfelt new novel by the author of The Next Thing on My List, a personal organizer must somehow convince a reclusive artist to give up her hoarding ways and let go of the stuff she's hung onto for decades.

In the humorous, heartfelt new novel by the author of The Next Thing on My List, a personal organizer must somehow convince a reclusive artist to give up her hoarding ways and let go of the stuff she's hung on to for decades.

Lucy Bloom is broke, freshly dumped by her boyfriend, and forced to sell her house to send her nineteen-year-old son to drug rehab. Although she's lost it all, she's determined to start over. So when she's offered a high-paying gig helping clear the clutter from the home of reclusive and eccentric painter Marva Meier Rios, Lucy grabs it. Armed with the organizing expertise she gained while writing her book, Things Are Not People, and fueled by a burning desire to get her life back on track, Lucy rolls up her sleeves to take on the mess that fills every room of Marva's huge home. Lucy soon learns that the real challenge may be taking on Marva, who seems to love the objects in her home too much to let go of any of them.

While trying to stay on course toward a strict deadline--and with an ex-boyfriend back in the picture, a new romance on the scene, and her son's rehab not going as planned--Lucy discovers that Marva isn't just hoarding, she is also hiding a big secret. The two form an unlikely bond, as each learns from the other that there are those things in life we keep, those we need to let go--but it's not always easy to know the difference.


Author Notes

Jill Smolinski is the author of the novels The Next Thing on My List and Flip-Flopped . Her work has appeared in major women's magazines, as well as in an anthology of short stories, American Girls About Town . She lives in Los Angeles with her son.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

When Lucy Bloom is hired by Will Meier to help his mother, famed painted Marva Meier Rios, clean out her house, she knows it won't be an easy task. Marva is a hoarder, with rooms filled to the ceiling with piles of belongings, but Lucy needs the job after paying for a pricey rehab facility for her teenage son, Ash, whose drug addiction has spiraled out of control. Marva proves a prickly customer, avoiding sorting through her things with Lucy and snapping at Lucy when she dares to take initiative. The job becomes even more complicated when Lucy is compelled to call on her ex-boyfriend Daniel for help selling some of Marva's collectibles. When Ash abruptly leaves rehab, Lucy is forced to confront how his addiction came between her and Daniel, even as she grapples with the shocking discovery of Marva's real motivation for getting rid of her possessions. A moving look at the dangers of holding on to both objects and one's misconceptions, Smolinski's third novel will draw readers in through her flawed but sympathetic characters.--Huntley, Kristine Copyright 2010 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

In Smolinski's heartfelt newest (after The Next Thing On My List), Lucy Bloom, a personal organizer, is desperately trying to get her life back on track. After getting dumped, she had to sell her home in order to finance her 19-year-old son Ash's stint in rehab; now Lucy is sharing a bedroom with a friend's toddler. In order to make a little money, she accepts a peculiar assignment: famed reclusive painter and hoarder Marva Meier Rios wants to clear out most of her possessions before her 65th birthday. Despite initiating the project, Marva is extremely reluctant to relinquish her belongings. Desperate, Lucy brings in ex-boyfriend Daniel, a collectibles enthusiast who treats Marva's things with an appropriate amount of respect. As the artist begins to open up and let go, Lucy and Daniel learn about Marva's complicated past and troubling secrets, and start to realize that even they might have relics holding them back-from one another and moving forward. Smolinski gracefully balances lighthearted humor with insightful musings on addiction, mortality, nostalgia, and affection, making this an entertaining and touching read. (May) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

Smolinski's (The Next Thing on My List) latest novel revolves around two completely different women brought together under unordinary circumstances. Lucy is broke and homeless, as she has sold everything to pay for her teenage son's rehab. Hired as a professional organizer to clean the home of the great artist Marva Meier Rios, Lucy soon discovers that Marva is difficult, withdrawn, and an incessant hoarder. Helping Marva sort through her possessions is a challenge made even more difficult when there is a fast-approaching deadline. As the two women work together, Lucy literally uncovers a secret that Marva is hoarding, and Marva learns a thing or two about the detached Lucy. Can the stubborn Marva make room for people in her overcluttered space before it's too late? VERDICT This is a pleasant and engaging novel with likable protagonists who evolve; however, the relationships among the book's other characters aren't as fully explored, and the resolution seems hurried and flat.-Anne M. Miskewitch, Chicago P.L. (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.