Cover image for The letters of Ernest Hemingway
Title:
The letters of Ernest Hemingway
Author:
Hemingway, Ernest, 1899-1961.
Physical Description:
v : illustrations, facsimiles, portraits 24 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
v. 1. 1907-1922 / volume associate editors, Albert J. DeFazio III, Miriam B. Mandel, Kenneth B. Panda ; volume advisory editor, J. Gerald Kennedy
ISBN:
9780521897334
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

With the first publication, in this edition, of all the surviving letters of Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961), readers will for the first time be able to follow the thoughts, ideas and actions of one of the great literary figures of the twentieth century in his own words. This first volume encompasses his youth, his experience in World War I and his arrival in Paris. The letters reveal a more complex person than Hemingway's tough guy public persona would suggest: devoted son, affectionate brother, infatuated lover, adoring husband, spirited friend and disciplined writer. Unguarded and never intended for publication, the letters record experiences that inspired his art, afford insight into his creative process and express his candid assessments of his own work and that of his contemporaries. The letters present immediate accounts of events and relationships that profoundly shaped his life and work. A detailed introduction, notes, chronology, illustrations and index are included.


Author Notes

Ernest Miller Hemingway was born in the family home in Oak Park, Ill., on July 21, 1899. In high school, Hemingway enjoyed working on The Trapeze, his school newspaper, where he wrote his first articles. Upon graduation in the spring of 1917, Hemingway took a job as a cub reporter for the Kansas City Star.

After a short stint in the U.S. Army as a volunteer Red Cross ambulance driver in Italy, Hemingway moved to Paris, and it was here that Hemingway began his well-documented career as a novelist. Hemingway's first collection of short stories and vignettes, entitled In Our Time, was published in 1925. His first major novel, The Sun Also Rises, the story of American and English expatriates in Paris and on excursion to Pamplona, immediately established him as one of the great prose stylists and preeminent writers of his time. In this book, Hemingway quotes Gertrude Stein, "You are all a lost generation," thereby labeling himself and other expatriate writers, including F. Scott Fitzgerald, T.S. Eliot, and Ford Madox Ford.

Other novels written by Hemingway include: A Farewell To Arms, the story, based in part on Hemingway's life, of an American ambulance driver on the Italian front and his passion for a beautiful English nurse; For Whom the Bell Tolls, the story of an American who fought, loved, and died with the guerrillas in the mountains of Spain; and To Have and Have Not, about an honest man forced into running contraband between Cuba and Key West. Non-fiction includes Green Hills of Africa, Hemingway's lyrical journal of a month on safari in East Africa; and A Moveable Feast, his recollections of Paris in the Roaring 20s. In 1954, Hemingway won the Nobel Prize in Literature for his novella, The Old Man and the Sea.

A year after being hospitalized for uncontrolled high blood pressure, liver disease, diabetes, and depression, Hemingway committed suicide on July 2, 1961, in Ketchum, Idaho.

(Bowker Author Biography) Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961) won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1954. He is one of the towering authors of the twentieth century.

(Publisher Provided)


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Here is the first of 12 planned volumes presenting more than 6,000 known letters the twentieth-century titan wrote by hand or with often wonky typewriters. Thirty years ago, the publication of Hemingway's Selected Letters, edited by biographer Carlos Baker, revealed how the writer's private persona contained a breezy, boisterous language all his own. This expansive scholarly project adds mounds of new evidence affirming the same. This volume begins in precocious boyhood, winds through Hemingway's early journalism jobs, his wounding and recuperation in WWI Italy, and the postwar years, when he set out to make himself a writer ( I was made to be one of those beastly writing chaps, y'Know ). The volume ends after Hemingway's first year in Paris, where he consorted with Ezra Pound and Gertrude Stein. Hemingway admirers, scholars, and students will find the book essential. The letters fill in abundant biographical and intellectual details, and readers will revel in the young man's exuberant wordplay, private language, and slang (some of which now feels gratingly harsh). At times Hemingway's jottings feel something like the Twitterage of today.--Paul, Steve Copyright 2010 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

The first of more than a dozen volumes bringing together the complete extant correspondence of this crucial modernist writer, this scrupulously edited and annotated book reveals a warm, amusing, and sensitive Hemingway. They begin with little Ernest around age 8, telling his father that he "saw a mother duck with seven little babies," and end with Hemingway at age 23, writing to such luminaries as Gertrude Stein, Sherwood Anderson, and Ezra Pound. Readers see his gradual emergence as a fiction writer, able to assert to his friend Ezra: "I know what I'm after in prose." Those familiar with the gruff, humorless, and word-chary sportsman of popular legend will be surprised to find a charming and compulsive correspondent whose garrulous voice works irresistible magic on the English language, with the young author revealing a keen eye for detail and a talent for reportage. Though clearly intended for an academic audience, the delight of these letters and the sheer quantity of useful editorial material-including excellent introductory essays, extensive notes for each letter, a chronology of Hemingway's life, maps of his journeys, and personal photographs-should entice even the most ardent Papa-reviler to delve into the spontaneous words of a creative genius. (Sept.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

This first of an eventual 12 volumes in Cambridge's ambitious program to publish all of Hemingway's roughly 6000 letters covers his childhood through his early apprenticeship in expatriate Paris. These juvenile missives are lighthearted and rife with slang and fabricated words, and Hemingway employs multiple silly nicknames for everyone, including himself. Ernest seems a very loving son and brother and a good pal. Though most of these juvenile missives (or screeds) are fairly routine, they reveal his developing voice-e.g., notes to his siblings and friends use vastly different language and tone from those to his parents. Readers can occasionally spy his BS machine forming-at 19 he's already embellishing stories about himself (e.g., he claims he carried "a Colt gat" as a cub reporter and beat a champion boxer). Each letter is well footnoted, and Spanier (English, Pennsylvania State Univ.) and Trogdon (English, Kent State Univ.) include numerous scholarly extras. VERDICT As close to a full-length Hemingway autobiography as possible, these letters provide a unique opportunity for framing him in everyday perspective and, frankly, humanizing him. Academics and aficionados will want this initial volume, but the best is yet to come.-Mike Rogers, Library Journal (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

There are more than 6,000 extant letters written by Hemingway (1899-1961); Cambridge expects them to fill 12 volumes. In this volume, the scholarly apparatus includes extensive footnotes that supply, in addition to normal identification of names and places Hemingway mentions, important biographical information about those whom Hemingway was writing about or with whom he was corresponding (summaries of correspondents' letters are included when relevant). More than those of any other writer known to this reviewer, Hemingway's letters document the process by which he made his life into literature. Early on in the letters he begins to refer to himself in the third person, and in so doing starts making himself into a persona whose places and actions letter-writer Hemingway narrates. Several years later that persona became the main character of his fictions. This first volume of letters is fundamental to understanding Hemingway's transition from all-American family son to independent agent with wide acquaintance, a man who chose his kind of life and made it the stuff of his writing. Required reading for anyone who wants to experience the fullness of Hemingway's early short and long narratives. Summing Up: Essential. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty; general readers. S. Miller Texas A&M University


Table of Contents

Sandra SpanierLinda Patter MillerRobert W. Trodgon
List of Platesp. viii
List of Mapsp. x
General Editor's Introduction to the Editionp. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xxxiv
Note on the Textp. xli
Abbreviations and Short Titlesp. xlviii
Foreword to the Volumep. liii
Introduction to the Volumep. Ixi
Chronologyp. lxxi
Mapsp. Lxxix
The Letters 1907-1922p. 1
Roster of Correspondentsp. 380
Calendar of Lettersp. 389
Index of Recipientsp. 408
General Indexp. 410