Cover image for Irena Sendler and the children of the Warsaw Ghetto
Title:
Irena Sendler and the children of the Warsaw Ghetto
Author:
Rubin, Susan Goldman.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Holiday House, [2011]

©2011
Physical Description:
40 pages : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
Using toolboxes, ambulances, and other ingenious measures, Irena Sendler defied the Nazis and risked her own life by saving and then hiding Jewish children. Her secret list of the children's real identities was kept safe, buried in two jars under a tree in war-torn Warsaw. An inspiring story of courage and compassion, this biography includes a list of resources, source notes, and an index.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
930 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 5.9 1.0 142576.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 6.6 3 Quiz: 52897.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780823422517
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
D804.66.S46 R83 2011 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
Searching...
Searching...
D804.66.S46 R83 2011 Juvenile Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...
Searching...
D804.66.S46 R83 2011 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
Searching...
Searching...
D804.66.S46 R83 2011 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
D804.66.S46 R83 2011 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
D804.66.S46 R83 2011 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
Searching...
Searching...
D804.66.S46 R83 2011 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
Searching...
Searching...
D804.66.S46 R83 2011 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

IIrena Sendler, a Polish social worker, helped nearly four hundred Jewish children out of the Warsaw Ghetto and into hiding during World War II.


Author Notes

Susan Goldman Rubin grew up in the Bronx and dreamed of becoming an artist. She illustrated her first three picture books but then turned to writing nonfiction, mainly about art and history, and is the author of more than 55 books for young people. Her titles include Diego Rivera: An Artist For The People, They Call Me A Hero: A Memoir of My Youth, Music Was It! Young Leonard Bernstein, Everyone Paints! The Art and Lives of the Wyeth Family, and Freedom Summer: The 1964 Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi.

Most recently Susan has created board books based on fine art for very young children. Her titles include Counting with Wayne Thiebaud, Andy Warhol's Colors, and Matisse: Dance For Joy.

Susan has been an instructor in the UCLA Extension Writers' Program for 20 years.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* Irena Sendler, a young Catholic social worker in Warsaw during WWII, watched as the city's Jews were confined in the overcrowded ghetto and, later, taken in groups to Treblinka. Risking her life, Irena worked with an underground organization, talking with parents in the ghetto, helping their babies and children escape its walls, teaching them enough Polish to deceive the Nazis, and placing them in convents and foster homes. Though she was captured by the Gestapo, tortured, and sentenced to death, Irena escaped and continued her work. By the war's end, she had rescued nearly 400 children and helped many more. The book concludes with an afterword, which explains why Sendler remained virtually unknown for decades, as well as lists of resources and source notes for quotes in the text. Rubin tells Sendler's dramatic story with quiet dignity and grace and lets her speak for herself in the last lines of the afterword. The book's large format gives plenty of scope for Farnsworth's impressive oil paintings. The many night scenes, in particular, make effective use of light, movement, and gesture. Although reflecting the quiet tone of the writing, the large-scale paintings also express the story's essential drama. A moving tribute to a courageous woman.--Phelan, Caroly. Copyright 2010 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Arresting oil paintings pair with vivid prose to tell the story of a Polish social worker who concealed Jewish children from the Nazis. In her third collaboration with Farnsworth set during WWII, Rubin reveals Sendler's harrowing efforts to transport children to safety in body bags and coffins, as well as her success in concealing a list of the children's names (in hopes that they might be reunited with their families). Sendler's resolute face is luminous against Farnsworth's bleak depictions of the ghetto and in a passage describing her torture by the Gestapo. It's a haunting and unflinching portrait of human valiance. Ages 6-10. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-7-When German troops occupied Warsaw in 1939, Sendler, a young Catholic social worker, immediately joined the resistance movement. She helped hundreds of Jews by issuing false documents and became an integral member of the underground organization known as Zegota. Disguised as a nurse, she used a forged medical pass to enter the Warsaw Ghetto to bring nearly 400 Jewish children to safety. She organized escape routes through the sewers; hid children under stretchers and floorboards in ambulances; and smuggled babies in potato sacks, suitcases, and toolboxes. She found havens in convents and orphanages, or placed children with Polish foster parents. Remarkably, Sendler kept careful records in the hope of being able to reunite them with their families after the war. Despite being jailed and tortured by the Gestapo, she miraculously escaped the firing squad and continued to work for the underground movement until the end of the war. She was labeled a traitor by the Soviet government, so her remarkable story wasn't brought to light until the collapse of communism in Poland in 1989. Rubin's detailed, lengthy text is paired with Farnsworth's dark, somber full-page oil paintings. As with other illustrated biographies of heroes from the Holocaust, such as David A. Adler's A Hero and the Holocaust: The Story of Janusz Korczak and His Children (Holiday House, 2002) and Michelle McCann's Luba: The Angel of Bergen-Belsen (Tricycle, 2003), readers mature enough to handle the difficult topic and complex story may be turned off by the picture-book format. However, this important story deserves a place on library shelves.-Rachel Kamin, North Suburban Synagogue Beth El, Highland Park, IL (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.