Cover image for When the thrill is gone
Title:
When the thrill is gone
Author:
Mosley, Walter.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Riverhead Books, [2011]

©2011
Physical Description:
359 pages ; 24 cm
Summary:
A beautiful young woman walks into PI Leonid McGill's office with a stack of cash. She's an artist, she tells Leonid, who's escaped poverty via marriage to a rich collector. A rich collector with two ex-wives whose deaths are shrouded in mystery. She says she fears for her life, and needs Leonid's help. Will sorting out the woman's crooked tale bring Leonid straight to death's door?
Language:
English
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9781594487811
Format :
Book

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On Order

Summary

Summary

Leonid McGill is back, in the third-and most enthralling and ambitious-installment in Walter Mosley's latest New York Times - bestselling series.

The economy has hit the private-investigator business hard, even for the detective designated as "a more than worthy successor to Philip Marlowe" ( The Boston Globe ) and "the perfect heir to Easy Rawlins" (Toronto Globe and Mail ). Lately, Leonid McGill is getting job offers only from the criminals he's worked so hard to leave behind. Meanwhile, his life grows ever more complicated: his favorite stepson, Twill, drops out of school for mysteriously lucrative pursuits; his best friend, Gordo, is diagnosed with cancer and is living on Leonid's couch; his wife takes a new lover, infuriating the old one and endangering the McGill family; and Leonid's girlfriend, Aura, is back but intent on some serious conversations...

So how can he say no to the beautiful young woman who walks into his office with a stack of cash? She's an artist, she tells him, who's escaped from poverty via marriage to a rich collector who keeps her on a stipend. But she says she fears for her life, and needs Leonid's help. Though Leonid knows better than to believe every word, this isn't a job he can afford to turn away, even as he senses that-if his family's misadventures don't kill him first-sorting out the woman's crooked tale will bring him straight to death's door.


Author Notes

Walter Mosley was born in Los Angeles, California on January 12, 1952. He graduated from Johnson State College in Vermont. His first book, Devil in a Blue Dress, was published in 1990, won a John Creasy Award for best first novel, and was made into a motion picture starring Denzel Washington in 1995. He is the author of the Easy Rawlins Mystery series, the Leonid McGill Mystery series, and the Fearless Jones series. His other works include Always Outnumbered, Always Outgunned, 47, Last Days of Ptolemy Grey, and Twelve Steps toward Political Revelation. He has received numerous awards, including an O. Henry Award, the Carl Brandon Society Parallax Award, and PEN America's Lifetime Achievement Award.

(Bowker Author Biography) Walter Mosley is the author of the acclaimed Easy Rawlins series of mysteries, the novels "Blue Light" and "RL's Dream", and two collections of stories featuring Socrates Fortlow, "Always Outnumbered", "Always Outgunned", for which he received the Anisfield-Wolf Award, and "Walkin' the Dog". He is a member of the board of directors of the National Book Awards and the founder of the PEN American Center's Open Book Committee. At various times in his life he has been a potter, a computer programmer, & a poet. He was born in Los Angeles & now lives in New York.

(Publisher Provided)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

In the third Leonid McGill mystery, following Known to Evil (2010),the African American private eye (he owes his unusual first name to his crackpot Communist father ), returns for another adventure. Unlike Mosley's celebrated Easy Rawlins novels, set in L.A. from the 1940s through the 1960s, this series is set in contemporary New York and features McGill employing all variety of high-tech gadgetry. And, yet, despite the trimmings, this one begins in classic hard-boiled Chandlerian fashion: a beautiful woman, Chrystal Tyler, arrives in McGill's office claiming her billionaire husband may be planning to kill her. The claim might be unbelievable, but her cash is real enough, prompting McGill to take the case. Inevitably, he finds himself stuck in the middle of a plot that's several levels more complicated than he had anticipated. Through three novels, McGill has become a likable enough series hero in the old-school mold. Mosley's many fans will find plenty to keep them engaged here, though they may still find themselves wondering if Rawlins really did die at the end of Blonde Faith (2007). HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Mosley's past successes have built a committed readership, especially for his crime fiction, and his publisher will make every effort to hook Easy Rawlins fans on this new series.--Pitt, David Copyright 2010 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Mosley's most recent series hero, New York City PI Leonid McGill, is perhaps his most complex-intelligent and surprisingly thoughtful and philosophic for a man of action. Mirron Willis conveys McGill's every mood; his timbre, clarity, and precise elocution are of particular importance, where there is a surfeit of story elements to keep straight. The main plot involves a deceitful client and McGill's investigation of a powerful billionaire whose wives have died mysteriously. Not only is it tricky and filled with false leads, there are numerous subplots involving the detective's personal life. His son is running a con game. His stepson is under the spell of a beautiful sociopath. His friend is dying of cancer and a young boy he's helping is on the run from thugs. (And that's not the half of it.) Master storyteller Mosley smoothly gathers all the many threads into a tidy bow at book's end, but it's Willis's crisp delivery that keeps us on track until he does. A Riverhead hardcover. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

PI Leonid McGill, a tough guy striving to make up for his past transgressions, carries a lot of baggage. When he was young, his father abandoned him and ran off to war somewhere, but Leonid's head is still filled with his father's revolutionary maxims. Leonid's best friend is dying of cancer in his apartment; Leonid loves his three children, but only one is really his; and his wife's cheating again. Mosley's plot is labyrinthine in this third series outing (after Known to Evil and The Long Fall), to say the least. A beautiful young woman hires Leonid to investigate her billionaire husband: she's convinced he plans to kill her. But the woman isn't who she says she is. Everyone lies to Leonid or hides things from him, but he plows ahead anyway. Mosley maintains interest until the end, when the plot fizzles out in a disappointing denouement VERDICT The scenes with Leonid's family are the best in the book, especially those that depict the sleuth's love for his wayward sons. Despite its flaws, this is an enjoyable book that will deservedly have fans. A welcome addition to a popular series. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 10/1/10.]-David Keymer, Modesto, CA (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.