Cover image for Look again
Title:
Look again
Author:
Scottoline, Lisa.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : St. Martin's Press, [2009]

©2009
Physical Description:
341 pages ; 25 cm
Summary:
When reporter Ellen Gleeson gets a "Have You Seen This Child?" flyer in the mail, her heart stops--the child in the photo is identical to her adopted son, Will. She investigates the story behind the flyer, uncovering clues no one was meant to discover, and when she digs too deep, she risks losing her own life--and that of the son she loves.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 4.9 14.0 132444.
ISBN:
9780312380724
Format :
Book

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On Order

Summary

Summary

When reporter Ellen Gleeson gets a "Have You Seen This Child?" flyer in the mail, she almost throws it away. But something about it makes her look again, and her heart stops--the child in the photo is identical to her adopted son, Will. Her every instinct tells her to deny the similarity between the boys, because she knows her adoption was lawful. But she's a journalist and won't be able to stop thinking about the photo until she figures out the truth. And she can't shake the question: if Will rightfully belongs to someone else, should she keep him or give him up? She investigates, uncovering clues no one was meant to discover, and when she digs too deep, she risks losing her own life--and that of the son she loves. Lisa Scottoline breaks new ground in Look Again , a thriller that's both heart-stopping and heart-breaking, and sure to have new fans and book clubs buzzing.


Author Notes

Lisa Scottoline was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on July 1, 1955. She received a B.A. in English with a concentration in the contemporary American novel from the University of Pennsylvania in 1976 and graduated cum laude from the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 1981. Before becoming an author, she worked as a trial lawyer.

Her first novel, Everywhere That Mary Went, was published in 1994. Her other books include Come Home, Keep Quiet, Every Fifteen Minutes, and Most Wanted. She also writes the Rosato and Associates series and the Rosato and Dinunzio Novel series.

Lisa's title, Daddy's Girl, is a April 2016 New York Times bestseller.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ellen Gleeson was balancing life as a single mother and a feature reporter as well as could be expected. She had taken on single parenthood voluntarily, having fallen in love with her adopted son, Will, now three, when he was a very sick infant. A have-you-seen-this-child postcard featuring a child who could be Will's twin catches Ellen's attention, and while she should be pursuing her assigned story about the emotional effect of Philadelphia's high teenage murder rate, she instead becomes obsessed with the missing child and with pursuing more details about Will's background. Her questions multiply when she learns that, just three weeks after she adopted Will, the attorney who handled the proceedings killed herself. Where is the birth mother, and why doesn't her family seem to know that she was pregnant? The answer only leads to danger, but Ellen, her reporter's instincts on high alert, is hell-bent on finding the truth, no matter the cost. In a departure from her wildly popular Rosato & Associates series, Scottoline still sticks to what she knows in this taut stand-alone: female drama, family ties, legal intrigue, and fast-paced action. A sure-fire winner.--Wilkens, Mary Frances Copyright 2009 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Single mother and journalist Ellen Gleeson is unsettled by a "Have You Seen This Child?" flyer that features a child disconcertingly similar to her adopted son. Curiosity compels her to investigate further, and as evidence spirals closer to the truth, Ellen's horror rises as she uncovers broken trails and untimely deaths that may or may not be related to her own situation. As skillful as Scottoline's thriller is, it is enhanced by Mary Stuart Masterson's performance. Her characterizations are distinct and evocative, her tone remains smooth, even while ratcheting up the tension and suspense. Listeners will be wholly absorbed by this moving story. A St. Martin's hardcover (Reviews, Feb. 16). (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

If you received news that threatened your family, would you ignore it or devote yourself to proving it false? Pennsylvania reporter Ellen Gleeson is living an ordinary life with her son and cat until she receives a "Have You Seen This Child?" flyer in the mail. The boy photographed in the flyer bears a striking resemblance to her three-year-old adopted son, Will, and becomes an object of obsession for Ellen, shaking the very foundations of her family and propelling her into an investigation. Is Will really Timothy Braverman, missing since infancy? Ellen finds herself anticipating the worst as her quest for the truth progresses. In typical Scottoline (Daddy's Girl) fashion, a strong female fights for what she believes in, despite more than her share of obstacles. Scottoline's best novel to date will have faithful fans and new readers singing her praises. Highly recommended to all public libraries.-Mary Todd Chesnut, Northern Kentucky Univ. Lib., Highland Heights (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

LOOK AGAIN (Chapter One) Ellen Gleeson was unlocking her front door when something in the mail caught her attention. It was a white card with photos of missing children, and one of the little boys looked oddly like her son. She eyed the photo as she twisted her key in the lock, but the mechanism was jammed, probably because of the cold. Snow encrusted SUVs and swing sets, and the night sky was the color of frozen blueberries. Ellen couldn't stop looking at the white card, which read HAVE YOU SEEN THIS CHILD? The resemblance between the boy in the photo and her son was uncanny. They had the same wide-set eyes, smallish nose, and lopsided grin. Maybe it was the lighting on the porch. Her fixture had one of those bulbs that was supposed to repel bugs but only colored them yellow. She held the photo closer but came to the same conclusion. The boys could have been twins. Weird,  Ellen thought. Her son didn't have a twin. She had adopted him as an only child. She jiggled the key in the lock, suddenly impatient. It had been a long day at work, and she was losing her grip on her purse, briefcase, the mail, and a bag of Chinese takeout. The aroma of barbecued spareribs wafted from the top, setting her stomach growling, and she twisted the key harder. The lock finally gave way, the door swung open, and she dumped her stuff onto the side table and shed her coat, shivering happily in the warmth of her cozy living room. Lace curtains framed the windows behind a red-and-white-checked couch, and the walls were stenciled with cows and hearts, a cutesy touch she liked more than any reporter should. A plastic toy chest overflowed with plush animals, Spot board books, and Happy Meal figurines, decorating never seen in  House & Garden . "Mommy, look!" Will called out, running toward her with a paper in his hand. His bangs blew off his face, and Ellen flashed on the missing boy from the white card in the mail. The likeness startled her before it dissolved in a wave of love, powerful as blood. "Hi, honey!" Ellen opened her arms as Will reached her knees, and she scooped him up, nuzzling him and breathing in the oaty smell of dry Cheerios and the faint almond scent of the Play-Doh sticking to his overalls. "Eww, your nose is cold, Mommy." "I know. It needs love." Will giggled, squirming and waving the drawing. "Look what I made! It's for you!" "Let's see." Ellen set him down and looked at his drawing, of a horse grazing under a tree. It was done in pencil and too good to be freehand. Will was no Picasso, and his go-to subject was trucks. "Wow, this is great! Thank you so much." "Hey, Ellen," said the babysitter, Connie Mitchell, coming in from the kitchen with a welcoming smile. Connie was short and sweet, soft as a marshmallow in a white sweatshirt that read PENN STATE, which she wore with wide-leg jeans and slouchy Uggs. Her brown eyes were bracketed by crow's-feet and her chestnut ponytail was shot through with gray, but Connie had the enthusiasm, if not always the energy, of a teenager. She asked, "How was your day?" "Crazy busy. How about you?" "Just fine," Connie answered, which was only one of the reasons that Ellen counted her as a blessing. She'd had her share of babysitter drama, and there was no feeling worse than leaving your child with a sitter who wasn't speaking to you. Will was waving his picture, still excited. "I drew it! All by myself!" "He traced it from a coloring book," Connie said under her breath. She crossed to the coat closet and retrieved her parka. "I  drew  it!" Will's forehead buckled into a frown. "I know, and you did a great job." Ellen stroked his silky head. "How was swimming, Con?" "Fine. Great." Connie put on her coat and flicked her ponytail out of the collar with a deft backhand. "He was a little fish." She got her brown purse and packed tote bag from the windowseat. "Will, tell Mommy how great you did without the kickboard." Will pouted, a mood swing typical of toddlers and manic-depressives. Connie zipped up her coat. "Then we drew pictures, right? You told me Mommy liked horses." "I  drew  it," Will said, cranky. "I love my picture, sweetie." Ellen was hoping to stave off a kiddie meltdown, and she didn't blame him for it. He was plainly tired, and a lot was asked of three-year-olds these days. She asked Connie, "He didn't nap, did he?" "I put him down, but he didn't sleep." "Too bad." Ellen hid her disappointment. If Will didn't nap, she wouldn't get any time with him before bed. Connie bent down to him. "See ya later . . ." Will was supposed to say "alligator," but he didn't. His lower lip was already puckering. "You wanna say good-bye?" Connie asked. Will shook his head, his eyes averted and his arms loose at his sides. He wouldn't make it through a book tonight, and Ellen loved to read to him. Her mother would turn over in her grave if she knew Will was going to bed without a book. "All right then, bye-bye," Connie said, but Will didn't respond, his head downcast. The babysitter touched his arm. "I love you, Will." Ellen felt a twinge of jealousy, however unreasonable. "Thanks again," she said, and Connie left, letting in an icy blast of air. Then she closed and locked the door. "I DREW IT!" Will dissolved into tears, and the drawing fluttered to the hardwood floor. "Aw, baby. Let's have some dinner." "All by myself!" "Come here, sweetie." Ellen reached for him but her hand hit the bag of Chinese food, knocking it to the floor and scattering the mail. She righted it before the food spilled, and her gaze fell on the white card with the photo of the missing boy. Uncanny . She picked up the bag of Chinese food and left the mail on the floor. For the time being. LOOK AGAIN Copyright (c) 2009 by Lisa Scottoline Excerpted from Look Again by Lisa Scottoline All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.