Cover image for One day at a time
Title:
One day at a time
Author:
Steel, Danielle.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Delacorte Press, [2009]

©2009
Physical Description:
320 pages ; 25 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780385340298
Format :
Book

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On Order

Summary

Summary

Danielle Steel celebrates families of every stripe in her compelling new novel; a tale of three very different couples who struggle and survive, love, laugh, and learn to take life. Coco Barrington was born into a legendary Hollywood family, her last name loaded with expectations. Her mother is a mega-bestselling author who writes under the name of Florence Flowers and her sister, Jane, is one of Hollywood's top producers. They're not your typical family by any means. Jane has lived with her partner, Liz, for ten years, in a solid, loving relationship. Florence, widowed but still radiant, has just begun a secret romance with a man twenty-four years her junior. And Coco, a law school dropout and the family black sheep, works as a dog walker, having fled life in the spotlight for the artsy northern California beach town of Bolinas. But when Coco reluctantly agrees to dog-sit in Jane's luxurious home, she soon discovers how much things can change in just a matter of days. It turns out Jane's house comes complete with an unexpected houseguest: Leslie Baxter, a dashing but down-to-earth British actor who is fleeing a psycho ex-girlfriend. Their worlds couldn't be more different. The attraction couldn't be more immediate. Suddenly Coco is seeing things differently: Leslie is not just a celebrity, he is a single dad to an adorable six-year-old girl. Her mother is not just a self-centered walking advertisement for great cosmetic surgery, she's a woman in love, with vulnerability and new insight. And Jane and Liz are about to take the bravest plunge of all into parenthood. As Coco contemplates a future with one of Hollywood's hottest stars, as her mother and sister settle into their lives, old wounds are healed and new families are formed; some traditional, some not so traditional, but all bonded by love. With wit and intelligence, Danielle Steel's new novel explores love in all its guises, taking us into the lives of three unusual but wonderfully real couples. Funny, sexy, and wise, One Day at a Time is at once moving, thought provoking, and utterly impossible to put down.


Author Notes

Danielle Steel was born in New York City on August 14, 1947. She studied literature, design, and fashion design - first at Parsons School of Design and later at New York University. Her first novel, Going Home, was published in 1972. Her other books include The House on Hope Street, The Wedding, Irresistible Forces, Granny Dan, Bittersweet, Mirror Image, The Klone and I, The Long Road Home, The Ghost, Special Delivery, The Ranch, His Bright Light, Southern Lights, Blue, Country, The Apartment, Property of a Noble Woman, The Mistress, Dangerous Games, Against All Odds, The Duchess, Fairytale, Fall From Grace, The Cast, The Good Fight, and Turning Point. A number of her novels have made major bestseller lists and have also been adapted into TV movies or miniseries. She also writes children's books including the Max and Martha series. In 2002, she was decorated by the French government as an Officer of the Order des Arts et des Letters for her contributions to world culture.

(Bowker Author Biography) Danielle Steel has been hailed as one of the world's most popular authors with over 430 million copies of her novels sold. Her many international bestsellers include: "The House on Hope Street," "The Wedding," "Irresistible Forces," "Granny Dan," "Bittersweet," "Mirror Image," "The Klone & I," "The Long Road Home," "The Ghost," "Special Delivery," "The Ranch," & other highly acclaimed novels. She is also the author of "His Bright Light," the story of her son Nick Traina's life and death.

(Publisher Fact Sheets)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Steel does not depart from her typical formula in this latest offering, which centers on the life of Coco Barrington, a young and beautiful daughter of privilege. Much to her domineering mother's shock, Coco not only drops out of law school but also rejects her family's wealthy L.A. lifestyle. She chooses, instead, to pursue a semi-hippie existence in an artsy Northern California beach town. After her equally footloose boyfriend dies in a hang-gliding accident, she finds herself bereft but still choosing to live apart from her family, existing on her trust fund and the little she makes from her dog-walking business. One weekend, while house-sitting for her movie-producer sister, Jane, she strikes up a friendship with Jane's houseguest, Leslie Baxter, an impossibly handsome and witty British actor, who is currently in hiding from a psycho ex-girlfriend. Not surprisingly, Leslie and Coco begin to fall in love, and after overcoming a series of difficulties, they appear to be headed for happily ever after. In addition, by the end, Coco has also begun to resolve her other familial difficulties, becoming closer to both her mother and sister. Fairly brief and lighthearted; nonetheless, Steel's fans will enjoy.--Hughes, Kathleen Copyright 2008 Booklist


Library Journal Review

See Prepub Alert, LJ 11/1/08; Dan John Miller reads. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

Chapter One It was an absolutely perfect June day as the sun came up over the city, and Coco Barrington watched it from her Bolinas deck. She sat looking at pink and orange streak across the sky as she drank a cup of steaming Chinese tea, stretched out on an ancient, faded broken deck chair she had bought at a yard sale. A weather-worn wooden statue of Qan Ying observed the scene peacefully. Qan Ying was the goddess of compassion, and the statue had been a treasured gift. Under the benevolent gaze of Qan Ying, the pretty auburn-haired young woman sat in the golden light of the sunrise, as the early summer sun shot copper lights through her long wavy hair, which hung nearly to her waist. She was wearing an old flannel nightgown with barely discernible hearts on it, and her feet were bare. The house she lived in sat on a plateau in Bolinas, overlooking the ocean and narrow beach below. This was exactly where Coco wanted to be. She had lived here for four years. This tiny forgotten farm and beach community, less than an hour north of San Francisco, suited her perfectly at twenty-eight. Calling her home a house was generous. It was barely more than a cottage, and her mother and sister referred to it as a hovel or, on better days, a shack. It was incomprehensible to either of them why Coco would want to live there--or how she would even tolerate it. It was their worst nightmare come true, even for her. Her mother had tried wheedling, insulting, criticizing, and even bribing her to come back to what they referred to as "civilization" in L.A. Nothing about her mother's life, or the way she had grown up, seemed "civilized" to Coco. In her opinion, everything about it was a fraud. The people, the way they lived, the goals they aspired to, the houses they lived in, and the face-lifts on every woman she knew. It all seemed artificial to her. Her life in Bolinas was simple and real. It was uncomplicated and sincere, just like Coco herself. She hated anything fake. Not that her mother was "fake." She was polished and had an image she was careful to maintain. Her mother had been a best-selling romance novelist for the past thirty years. What she wrote wasn't fraudulent, it simply wasn't deep, but there was a vast following for her work. She wrote under the name Florence Flowers, a nom de plume from her own mother's maiden name, and she had enjoyed immense success. She was sixty-two years old and had lived a storybook life, married to Coco's father, Bernard "Buzz" Barrington, the most important literary and dramatic agent in L.A. until his death four years before. He had been sixteen years older than her mother and was still going strong when he died of a sudden stroke. He had been one of the most powerful men in the business, and had babied and protected his wife through all thirty-six years of their marriage. He had encouraged and shepherded her career. Coco always wondered if her mother would have made it as a writer in the early days without her father's help. Her mother never asked herself the same question and didn't for an instant doubt the merit of her work, or her myriad opinions about everything in life. She made no bones about the fact that Coco was a disappointment to her, and didn't hesitate to call her a dropout, a hippie, and a flake. Coco's equally successful sister Jane's assessment of her was loftier, though not kinder: Jane referred to Coco as a "chronic underachiever." She pointed out to her younger sister that she had had every possible opportunity growing up, every chance to make a success of her life, and thus far had thrown it all away. She reminded her regularly that it wasn't too late to turn the boat around, but as long as she continued to live in a shack in Bolinas like a beach bum, her life would be a mess. Her life didn't feel like a mess to Coco. She supported herself, was respectable, she didn't do drugs and never had Excerpted from One Day at a Time by Danielle Steel All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.