Cover image for Angel girl
Title:
Angel girl
Author:
Friedman, Laurie B., 1964-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Minneapolis [Minn.] : Carolrhoda Books, [2008]

©2008
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 26 cm
Summary:
A prisoner in a Nazi labor camp, Herman soon loses the will to go on. Then a young girl appears on the other side of the barbed-wire fence--an angel bearing food and hope. Based on a true story.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
Ages 7-11.

AD 250 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader/Renaissance Learning LG 2.7 0.5

Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.7 0.5 122675.

Reading Counts RC K-2 1.6 1 Quiz: 44911.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780822587392
Format :
Book

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DS134.72.R67 F75 2008 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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DS134.72.R67 F75 2008 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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DS134.72.R67 F75 2008 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

A prisoner in a Nazi labor camp, Herman soon loses the will to go on. Then a young girl appears on the other side of the barbed-wire fence--an angel bearing food and hope. Based on a true tale of survival, this book tells a story of love, hope, and the strength of the human spirit. Full color.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Women, children to the left. Men to the right. Honest and never exploitative, this powerful Holocaust picture book for older children begins in a death camp. Herman, 11, is separated from his mother; he never sees her again. Pictures, slightly Expressionist in style, show the emaciated boy in striped pajamas, in line with others, and also alone in his bunk, dreaming his mother will come: When are you coming to tuck me in? One night, she appears, telling him an angel will save him. A farm girl comes, risking everything to bring him food. Anguished close-ups show youngsters on opposite sides of the barbed-wire fence. At liberation they say good-bye, but years later, on a blind date, Herman meets a woman who turns out to be his angel girl.  Although the statement based on a true story,  which appears on the jacket, begs the question of what's fiction, this is still a powerful tale. An appended page presents more about Herman's experience, which will be further explored in The Fence, a movie to be released in 2009.--Rochman, Hazel Copyright 2008 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-8-This picture book describes how young Herman Rosenblatt survived internment in a German concentration camp thanks in part to a girl who came to the barbed-wire fence each day and threw him an apple. Years later, after emigrating to the U.S., he and his "angel girl" were reunited by a blind date. They have been married for 50 years. This heartwarming story is told in a spare, poetic, first-person text that brings the poignancy of the young man's situation to the surface. The stylized color illustrations are stark but not graphic. Light is well used to draw viewers to the characters' faces, which is where the main action of this emotional tale takes place. While the pictures show no violence, the text, including the author's note, does not shy away from mention of starvation, fear, and death. Little historical context is provided, which makes this book more appropriate for readers already familiar with the Holocaust. The romanticism and the fact that this is a true story (including a back-matter photo of the real Herman and Roma) should make this an easy sell to older children in spite of its picture-book format. As a story of resistance and survival, it fits in well with the trend in Holocaust juvenile literature of conveying messages of empowerment.-Heidi Estrin, Feldman Children's Library at Congregation B'nai Israel, Boca Raton, FL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.