Cover image for Juliet's moon
Title:
Juliet's moon
Author:
Rinaldi, Ann.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Orlando : Harcourt, [2008]

©2008
Physical Description:
249 pages ; 22 cm.
Summary:
In Missouri in 1863, twelve-year-old Juliet Bradshaw learns to rely on herself and her brother, a captain with Quantrill's Raiders, as she sees her family home burned, is imprisoned by Yankees, and then kidnapped by a blood-crazed Confederate soldier.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
630 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 4.2 6.0 122064.

Reading Counts RC 6-8 3.5 12 Quiz: 44151.
ISBN:
9780152061708
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

War is turning Juliet Bradshaw's world upside down. Her brother, Seth, rides with William Quantrill's renegade Confederate army, but he's helpless when the Yankees arrest Juliet along with the wives and sisters of Quantrill's soldiers as spies. Imprisoned in a dilapidated old house in Kansas City, Juliet is one of a handful of survivors after the building collapses, killing most of the young girls inside. When she's reunited with her brother, Juliet finds the life she had previously known is gone. Surrounded by secrets, lies, murder, and chaos, she must determine just how far she will go to protect the people and things she holds dear.


Author Notes

Young adult author Ann Rinaldi was born in New York City on August 27, 1934. After high school, she became a secretary in the business world. She got married in 1960 and stopped working, but after having two children she decided to try writing. In 1969, she wrote a weekly column in the Somerset Messenger Gazette and in 1970 she wrote two columns a week for the Trentonian, which eventually led to her writing features and soft new stories. She published her first novel Term Paper in 1979, but was ultimately drawn to writing historical fiction when her son became involved in reenactments while he was in high school. Her first historical fiction novel was Time Enough for Drums. She also writes for the Dear America series. She currently lives in Somerville, New Jersey with her husband.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Pa dead. House and barn burned. Negroes run off. These events mark the end of 12-year-old Juliet's childhood, and the beginning of further Civil War trauma. First, she is imprisoned for aiding Quantrill's Raiders, a gang of anti-Yankee guerrillas to which her brother belongs. Then, the prison collapses a real event that Rinaldi says inspired this novel, which concludes with a note and a scholarly bibliography. Invented character Juliet survives the collapse, and the rest of the book deals with her near-daily confrontation with threats and her mounting competence in dealing with them. Rinaldi's latest lacks the cohesion of her best historical fiction, with the role of historical figure Sue Mundy, a man who masqueraded as a female Raider, seeming particularly underdeveloped. But Juliet's turbulent yet loving relationship with her protective brother is warmly evoked, and the book's mixed characterization of the Raiders will spur readers, like the heroine, to contemplate how wartime exposes the dark side of the moon within everyone.--Mattson, Jennifer Copyright 2008 Booklist


Excerpts

Excerpts

Chapter One LIKE I SAID, my secret hiding place saved me and Maxine that day, just as I used to fancy it would. Id stocked it well with sugar cookies, slices of smoked ham, even tins of food like Seth used in his guerrilla unit when he fought with Quantrill and his Raiders. Maxine, our house nigra, cook, and all-around friend to Seth and me, had given me a stone jar of water, pillows, and blankets to make it comfortable. And, of course, I had my box of treasures: marbles Id won from Seth at our last game; a blue feather from a peacock; one of Pas cigars, unsmoked, that Id stolen from his desktop; some quills for a pen; a set of teeth from an animal that I like to think was a baby dragon found by the creek in back of the house; and my mothers good pearl necklace that she gave me when I turned twelve. Right before she died. Maxine was having some difficulty climbing the ladder to the tree house. I had to help her up. We spent the rest of the afternoon there. We ate the cookies and ham. We could see the house from where we were, disappearing in the smoke, belching flames from its windows. And Pa, standing there alone one minute, alone in the barnyard, like he was cleaning his rifle, but waiting for the Yankees to return from the wheat fields. And in the next minute lying at the feet of the Yankees. Shot. I didnt love Pa. I never had. Not like I loved Mama and Seth. Pa was gruff and had a quick, hard hand to slap and no patience with a little girl. Seth knew how to handle him; I didnt. Seth even bad-mouthed him, jokingly, calling him an old codger or some other term that Pa never seemed to mind. If I did that, Id be put in a closet in the cellar and made to wait there until Seth talked him into pardoning me. Then Seth would come down and get me. "Dont you know any better?" hed say as I clung to him. "You cant talk to him like that." "You do," Id sob. Though they had their fights, Pa gave Seth freedom to "sow his wild oats" and would lecture him at the table the next morning. Seth yes sird and no sird him to death. "Hed be disappointed in Seth if he didnt sow his wild oats," Maxine told me. Once, when Seth didnt get home by four in the morning, Pa sealed up the house. Locked him right out. Seth came rapping softly at my window and I let him in. I got time in the cellar closet the next day, and Seth had to talk him out of my punishment. I know Pa didnt like girls. I know hed wanted another son, instead of me. And he never let me forget it. For fatherly affection I went to Seth. Pa didnt care at all. Still, Pa shot! It was outside the realm of all family pettiness. He was still my father. Shot for what? For not giving out the whereabouts of his sons guerrilla army unit? For not telling where their cache of ammunition was stored? I shivered. Maxine put a blanket around me. "Pas dead," I told her. "I know, chile." "Im an orphan. Will the authorities put me in an orphanage in Kansas City?" "Aint no orphanage in Excerpted from Juliet's Moon by Ann Rinaldi All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.