Cover image for The all-I'll-ever-want Christmas doll
Title:
The all-I'll-ever-want Christmas doll
Author:
McKissack, Pat, 1944-2017.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Schwartz & Wade Books, [2007]

©2007
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
During the Depression, three young sisters get one baby doll for Christmas and must find a way to share.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.3 0.5 117897.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780375937590
Format :
Book

Available:*

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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Childrens Area-Holiday
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Holiday
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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Summary

Summary

IT'S CHRISTMAS, AND NELLA is beside herself with excitement She and her sisters have been given a real gift - a beautiful Baby Betty doll. But it's hard to share something you've waited your whole seven-year-old life for, and Nella grabs the doll for herself. It isn't long before she discovers that a doll can't do the fun things she and her sisters do together. So, as Christmas day fades, Nella shares it with her sisters. Set in the Depression era South, here's a heartwarming story that captures the essence of the holiday. From the Hardcover edition.


Author Notes

Patricia C. McKissack was born in Smyrna, Tennessee on August 9, 1944. She received a bachelor's degree in English from Tennessee State University in 1964 and a master's degree in early childhood literature and media programming from Webster University in 1975. After college, she worked as a junior high school English teacher and a children's book editor at Concordia Publishing.

Since the 1980's, she and her husband Frederick L. McKissack have written over 100 books together. Most of their titles are biographies with a strong focus on African-American themes for young readers. Their early 1990s biography series, Great African Americans included volumes on Frederick Douglass, Marian Anderson, and Paul Robeson. Their other works included Black Hands, White Sails: The Story of African-American Whalers and Days of Jubilee: The End of Slavery in the United States. Over their 30 years of writing together, the couple won many awards including the C.S. Lewis Silver Medal, a Newbery Honor, nine Coretta Scott King Author and Honor awards, the Jane Addams Peace Award, and the NAACP Image Award for Sojourner Truth: Ain't I a Woman?. In 1998, they received the Coretta Scott King-Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement.

She also writes fiction on her own. Her book included Flossie and the Fox, Stitchin' and Pullin': A Gee's Bend Quilt, A Friendship for Today, and Let's Clap, Jump, Sing and Shout; Dance, Spin and Turn It Out! She won the Newberry Honor Book Award and the King Author Award for The Dark Thirty: Southern Tales of the Supernatural in 1993 and the Caldecott Medal for Mirandy and Brother Wind. She dead of cardio-respiratory arrest on April 7, 2017 at the age of 72.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* Growing up during the Depression, Nella and her two sisters have little expectation of gifts on Christmas morning. But one year, after Nella writes to Santy Claus asking for a store-bought doll, their father surprises the girls with a Baby Betty doll for the three of them to share. They fight over their gift, but finally Nella's sisters agree that she can have it. After a day of playing with Baby Betty, who, unlike Nella's sisters, is compliant but has little to say, Nella misses her siblings and finds a way to make amends. As explained in the author's note, McKissack takes a bit of oral history and retells it as a first-person memoir that works well as a picture-book text. Pinkney creates a series of beautiful narrative tableaux, illustrating the characters' feelings as well as their actions with clarity and grace. Parents looking for books on sharing will find this an appealing exploration of the subject, teachers seeking picture books set during the Depression will find many details that bring the period to life. A gentle lesson that plays into the spirit of the holiday.--Phelan, Carolyn Copyright 2007 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

In expertly wrought watercolors, Pinkney focuses on how light hits certain objects-voluptuous oranges, a new patchwork quilt, a baby doll's yellow frock-which are some literal bright spots for a family holding onto the positive despite their Depression-era struggles. The newspapers that line the walls and three-to-a-bed sleeping conditions fade, ceding to the clan's Christmas observance. McKissack's story shines as well, homing in on the most straightforward language to convey realistic but difficult situations: "Christmas always came to our house, but Santy Claus only showed up once in a while." Ages 4-8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-5-During the Great Depression, the all-black town of Boykin, AL, was identified as "the poorest place in America." "Santy" hardly ever showed up, but this year middle-child Laura Nell Pearson writes him a letter asking for a Baby Betty doll that she's seen advertised in a newspaper. Her two sisters are scornful, but to their amazement, the doll appears on Christmas morning. Of course there's a fight, and Daddy and Mama tell the girls to work it out. Laura convinces her sisters that the doll belongs to her, but soon discovers that playing with an inanimate object isn't as much fun as it is to play with real live sisters, and in the end invites them to a tea party for Baby Betty. McKissack's knack for combining historical detail with true-to-life family drama and language is shown to good effect, showcased beautifully by Pinkney's evocative watercolors, which give a real flavor of the time period. An author's note at the beginning gives the history of the story. Learning to appreciate what you have and to share what you get are two lessons that never go out of style.-Mara Alpert, Los Angeles Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.