Cover image for Grace (eventually) thoughts on faith
Title:
Grace (eventually) thoughts on faith
Author:
Lamott, Anne.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Penguin Audio, [2007]

â„—2007
Physical Description:
5 audio discs (approximately 5 1/2 hr.) : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
Summary:
Anne Lamott shares her faith with you.
General Note:
Unabridged.

Compact disc.

In container (17 cm.)
Language:
English
Personal Subject:
Genre:
ISBN:
9780143142089
Format :
Audiobook on CD

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PS3562.A4645 Z464 2007C Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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PS3562.A4645 Z464 2007C Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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PS3562.A4645 Z464 2007C Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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PS3562.A4645 Z464 2007C Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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PS3562.A4645 Z464 2007C Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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PS3562.A4645 Z464 2007C Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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PS3562.A4645 Z464 2007C Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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Summary

Summary

The sharp, funny, and heartfelt follow-up to her bestselling Plan B, Anne Lamott's newest collection is a personal exploration of the faith and grace all around us.

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Author Notes

Anne Lamott was born on April 10, 1954 in San Francisco, California. She began writing when she returned to California after spending two years at Goucher College, but her early efforts, mostly short stories, met with little success. The turning point in her writing came with a family crisis, when her father was diagnosed with brain cancer. She wrote a series of short pieces about the traumatic effect that serious illness has on a family. These pieces were published, and they eventually became the basis of her first novel, Hard Laughter, published in 1980.

During the 1980s, she wrote three additional novels, Rosie, Joe Jones and All New People. In 1989, her life took another turn when her son was born. Her next book, published in 1993, was a non-fiction effort called Operating Instructions: A Journal of My Son's First Year. She wrote ironically, but candidly, about her struggles to adjust to her new role as a mother and a single parent, and her experiences with everything from sleep deprivation to financial and emotional uncertainty to concerns about what she would tell her son when he was old enough to ask about his absent father.

Operating Instructions proved to be even more successful than her novels, and led to interviews on network news programs and a regular spot on National Public Radio. Her other works include Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life; Crooked Little Heart; Blue Shoe, Imperfect Birds, and Some Assembly Required: A Journal of My Son's First Son. Her title Help, Thanks, Wow: The Three Essential Prayers made The New York Times Best Seller List for 2012. Her title Stitches: A Handbook on Meaning, Hope and Repair and Small Victories: Spotting Improbable Moments of Grace also made The New York Times Best Seller List.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Lamott's third collection of funny, smart, and prayerful essays-to-live-by contains just what readers expect from this nimble and candid writer: the unexpected. Sure, Lamott writes, as she always does, about her son, Sam, now 17. And yes, she continues to shift through the psychic rubble of her bad drinking and drug days, searching for shards of wisdom and bright bits of sustaining humor. But the particulars are always startling and provocative because, like all artists, Lamott can riff inventively on the most commonplace themes. She presents finely crafted homilies about binging and aging, and recounts episodes of despair, craziness, fear, guilt, and grief, followed by out-of-the-blue rescues. An advocate for kindness, reflection, and the ongoing effort to do the right thing, Lamott can be downright rancorous and self-absorbed, just like everyone else. And for all her attachment to her church community, she thinks for herself, and believes deeply in freedom. Consequently, she speaks out for women's reproductive rights, and helps a terminally ill friend die. Irreverently reverent, Lamott is resplendent in Steinbeck Country, a beacon-in-the-dark essay about the importance of public libraries in which she praises librarians as healers and magicians. Lamott also performs these essential roles, and readers do feel better for it. --Donna Seaman Copyright 2007 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

It would be easy to mistake this book for more of the same. Like Lamott's earlier spiritual nonfiction, Traveling Mercies and Plan B, it's a collection of essays, mostly previously published. The three books have strikingly similar covers and nearly identical subtitles. The familiar topics are here-Mom; her son, illness; death; addictions; Jesus; Republicans-as is the zany attitude. Not that repetitiveness matters; Lamott's faithful fans would line up to buy her shopping lists. But these recent essays show a new mellowness: "I don't hate anyone right now, not even George W. Bush. This may seem an impossibility, but it is true, and indicates the presence of grace or dementia, or both." With gentle wisdom refining her signature humor, Lamott explores helpfulness, decency, love and especially forgiveness. She explains the change: "Sometimes I act just as juvenile as I ever did, but as I get older, I do it for shorter periods of time. I find my way back to the path sooner, where there is always one last resort: get a glass of water and call a friend." Here's hoping that grace eventually persuades this older, wiser Lamott that her next nonfiction book should be wholly original. (Mar. 20) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

This third in a series (following Traveling Mercies and Plan B) records Lamott's attempts to live with grace. Now 20 years sober and the single mother of a 17-year-old son, the author shares 23 stories of her life, eight never before published. Covering everything from politics to child rearing to experiences teaching Sunday school, the essays are well written and heartfelt. Lamott is most effective when talking about her spiritual beliefs and how they developed over time. She gets her message across without being preachy, and she's never condescending, instead telling us what she did in certain situations and how it worked or didn't work. Constant references to her sobriety, weight issues, and curly hair are getting a bit repetitious after the two other books, but it's part of her charm, and fans won't be disappointed. Essential for libraries with the previous works. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 11/1/06.]-Jennifer Kuncken, Williamsburg Regional Lib., VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.