Cover image for My secret life on the McJob : lessons from behind the counter guaranteed to supersize any management style
Title:
My secret life on the McJob : lessons from behind the counter guaranteed to supersize any management style
Author:
Newman, Jerry M.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : McGraw-Hill, [2007]

©2007
Physical Description:
203 pages ; 24 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Contents:
Introduction: Would you like fries with that condom? -- The rules of the game -- The McJob isn't McEasy -- The great cheese wars and other culture tales from behind the counter -- Will work for Whoppers! -- Training the utterly confused -- Diversity, discrimination, and lap dancing -- I blame it on Henry Ford -- Reflections on fast food.
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9780071473651
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Once upon a time, a Ph.D. went to work at Mickey D's...

And what he found was illuminating. Jerry Newman, a college professor who has taught business courses for nearly 30 years, went undercover as a bottom-rung worker for the biggest names in fast food, including McDonald's and Burger King. Newman found that fast-food chains were the perfect petri dishes for covert research: High-pressure, high-volume businesses with high-employee turnover. The pecking order was also crystal clear, from fry cook all the way up to store manager.

Of the seven restaurants where Newman worked, some were high-morale, high-productivity machines. Others were miserable, misplaced circles of hell. Yet one common trait stuck out from them all: Each restaurant's respective manager determined the climate of the work environment.

Go behind the fast food counter with Newman and see what happens on an average day on the "McJob"…

how the restaurants are run (for better or worse)

how managers reward good employees when raises are impossible (believe it or not, bosses give 'em more hours-and it works!)

how morale and motivation spring directly from the manager's office

and how a few simple adjustments to your own management style-the "Supersized Management Principles" in this book-can transform and invigorate your workplace


Author Notes

Jerry M. Newman, Ph.D., is a University Distinguished Teaching Professor for the State University of New York at Buffalo. He is the coauthor of Compensation , which has been the bestselling book in the category for 21 years. He is also an advisor to firms including AT&T, Hewlett-Packard, Burger King, McDonald's, and Nabisco.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Newman (State Univ. of New York at Buffalo) worked at seven nonsupervisory jobs at fast-food restaurants such as McDonald's, Burger King, Arby's, and Wendy's to covertly research management styles, motivation, and morale. His book provides an inside view of how these restaurants operate. Management styles made the biggest difference in his quality of work life. He found that most managers mechanically performed their jobs and did not want to be there. The best managers took time to care about relationships and performance. People who work fast food do so to survive, earn money to move on, aimlessly work, or use the job as a career step. Though they may work near minimum wage, job security exists as long as they marginally do their job. Some companies train workers to think the job is easy, although flipping hamburgers all day can be physically straining. Based on his experiences with these restaurants, Newman developed "Supersized Management Principles" designed to improve staff motivation and performance, e.g., giving workers realistic job previews, following the progress of workers, and correcting behaviors before they become bad habits. This short, one-of-a-kind book reads like a series of stories with a hint of academics. No references included or needed. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduate through professional business collections. G. E. Kaupins Boise State University