Cover image for The wildest brother
Title:
The wildest brother
Author:
Funke, Cornelia Caroline.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First American edition.
Publication Information:
New York : The Chicken House/Scholastic, 2006.

©2004
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 790 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.1 0.5 106379.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.6 1 Quiz: 38739 Guided reading level: H.
ISBN:
9780439828628
Format :
Book

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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Fearless Ben spends his day protecting his older sister, Anna, from ghosts, monsters, and other beasts - but when night falls, Ben doesn't feel quite so brave. "The formidable duo behind The Princess Knight and Pirate Girl presses on to an exploration of the relationship between a real-world sister and brother, with rip-roaring results." - Publishers Weekly


Author Notes

Author Cornelia Maria Funke was born in Dorsten, Germany on December 10, 1958. After graduating from the University of Hamburg, she worked as a social worker for three years. After completing a course in book illustration at the Hamburg State College of Design, she worked as a children's book illustrator and designed board games.

Her desire to draw magical worlds and her disappointment over the way some stories were written inspired her to write her own children's books. Her book, The Thief Lord, won the Mildred L. Batchelder Award for the best translated children's book of the year and the Book Sense Book of the Year Award. She has also received the Book Sense Children's Literature Award for Inkheart and Inkspell.

Funke has written numerous books including Dragon Rider, When Santa Fell to Earth, Igraine The Brave, Reckless, Saving Mississippi, Inkheart, Inkspell, Inkdeath, Igraine the Brave, and The Princess Knight. Inkheart was adapted into a film. Cornelia Funke was voted into the Time magazine's list of the 100 most influential people of 2005.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

PreS-Gr. 2. The creators of The Princess Knight0 (2004) 0 and Pirate Girl 0 (2005) offer another picture book, this time featuring the adventures of contemporary kids close to home. "Sometimes when Ben wakes up he is a wild wolf. Or a knight." In short, deadpan sentences, Funke describes a boy's imagined games. Armed with toy swords and water pistols, he pretends to protect his older sister, Anna, from endless threats--monsters, burglars, and bears. But at night, when "the heating creaks like the sound of a thousand biting beetles," it's Anna who protects her frightened brother. Wright's wonderfully expressive acrylic paintings elevate this simple glimpse of sibling play into something special. The animated scenes, filled with Ben's imagined foes, perfectly capture the wild-eyed, physical fun; the shifting emotions as brother and sister tussle and tease; and finally, their comfort. For another sibling story, suggest LeUyen Pham's Big Sister, Little Sister 0 (2005) or Lynne Jonnell's Let's Play Rough0 (2000). --Gillian Engberg Copyright 2006 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

The formidable duo behind The Princess Knight and Pirate Girl presses on to an exploration of the relationship between a real-world sister and brother, with rip-roaring results. All day long, Ben, "lionhearted and elephant-strong," defends his big sister Anna from a man-eating monster (fighting it with "his three plastic swords, pumpkin-sized water pistol, and rubber knife"), moldy green ghosts (he shreds them and flushes them down the toilet) and a slime-burping monster (he tosses the intruder off the balcony). Anna's realistic reactions range from placid non-intervention to energetic tickling ("Big sisters, unfortunately, know exactly where little brothers are ticklish"). Meyer's virtuosity with the paintbrush possesses the same swashbuckling ?lan as Ben's monster-fighting skills. Spot illustrations keep the action brisk, and the white space around the drawings adds a kind of Wild West, open-space feel to the proceedings. Anna's trio of wide-eyed guinea pigs provide bonus giggles as they cheer Ben on from the sidelines. Funke delivers a comic twist when night comes. Odd noises drive Ben into big sister Anna's bed: "Then she protects him... And it is sooo wonderful to have a big, strong sister." Readers may well wish they had a Ben of their own to defend them-and an Anna, too. Ages 4-8. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 1-Ben is a brave and loyal little brother. Sure, he uses Anna's makeup to paint red blobs on her desk. But really they're drops of blood from the man-eating monster standing behind her, fork in hand, sprinkling her hair with a soup?on of salt. He instructs her to hide inside her wardrobe and make monster noises (no giggling-this will inflame the creature) while he attacks the suddenly ferocious armoire with his plastic artillery. While Anna extricates herself from her vanquished furniture, Ben is battling the green bathroom slime, the weekly burglar, and the backyard bears. His strength and courage are distinguished by a trail of spilt and broken things left in the wake of his heroics. Yet when night sneaks in through the windows, Ben is up against the wildest monster of all and he is so very glad to have a sister to shelter him. Meyer's color-soaked cartoons are bursting with a zany energy in which fantasy becomes real. While the text is somewhat awkward, Meyer takes up the slack whenever the words falter. This is not so much the story of a small boy's daytime bravery and nighttime fears as it is the tender description of a special sibling relationship.-Susan Weitz, formerly at Spencer-Van Etten School District, Spencer, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.