Cover image for The Wright 3
Title:
The Wright 3
Author:
Balliett, Blue, 1955-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Scholastic Press, 2006.
Physical Description:
318 pages : illustrations, 1 map ; 22 cm
Summary:
In the midst of a series of unexplained accidents and mysterious coincidences, sixth-graders Calder, Petra, and Tommy lead their classmates in an attempt to keep Frank Lloyd Wright's famous Robie House from being demolished.
Language:
English
Contents:
Invisible -- Murder in the classroom -- Life & art -- Find -- Tales from the tracks -- New pentominoes -- Fear it -- Ghastly face -- Bite -- Do not enter -- Haystack idea -- Three! -- Link -- One huge pattern -- Cgoldman knows -- Rear windows -- Part of the art -- Sacrilege -- Red Herrings -- Horror -- In the boxes -- Silvery voice -- Triangle of gold -- Japanese garden -- Inside at night -- Net -- Three little birdies -- Lost and found -- He's here! -- Summer in Hyde Park.
Reading Level:
870 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 5.7 7.0 105862.

Reading Counts RC 6-8 5.6 12 Quiz: 38568 Guided reading level: T.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780439693677
Format :
Book

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J FICTION Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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J FICTION Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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J FICTION Juvenile Fiction Mystery/Suspense
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J FICTION Juvenile Fiction Mystery/Suspense
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J FICTION Juvenile Fiction Mystery/Suspense
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Spring semester at the Lab School in Hyde Park finds Petra and Calder drawn into another mystery when unexplainable accidents and ghostly happenings throw a spotlight on Frank Lloyd Wright's Robie House, and it's up to the two junior sleuths to piece together the clues. Stir in the return of Calder's friend Tommy (which creates a tense triangle), H.G. Wells's The Invisible Man, 3-D pentominoes, and the hunt for a coded message left behind by Wright, and the kids become tangled in a dangerous web in which life and art intermingle with death, deception, and surprise.


Author Notes

Blue Balliett was born in New York City in 1955. She received a degree in art history from Brown University. After graduating, she moved to Nantucket Island, Massachusetts and wrote two books of ghost stories. She eventually moved to Chicago and taught third grade at the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools. Her first children's book, Chasing Vermeer, won the 2005 Edgar Award in the Best Juvenile category. Her other works include The Wright 3 (2006), The Calder Game (2008), and The Danger Box (2010).

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 5-8. How many newsworthy art crimes can 12-year-old sleuths thwart in a single year? At least two, as readers will discover in this sequel to Balliett's celebrated Chasing Vermeer0 (2004). After all, "magical coincidences" are what these -thinking-kids' adventures are all about. Tommy Segovia, the best friend Calder corresponded with during the Vermeer crisis, has returned to Hyde Park, and he resents Petra and Calder's tight twosome. But when a house by Frank Lloyd Wright is slated for destruction, the sixth-graders overcome tensions to save the landmark and decode its secrets--among them, an intriguing buried artifact. Leapfrogging connections and mystical messages from Calder's pentominoes once again drive the plot, but some children may find this second installment more arcane than the first, with too much focus on Wright and his genius, difficult-to-follow gleanings from sources as eclectic as H. G. Wells' Invisible Man 0 and Fibonacci, and a central problem that lacks the glamorous hook of an international art heist. But determined fans will grab hold of the true-to-life friendship issues Balliett introduces, and some--particularly her brainiest, most open-minded readers--will emerge energized by the invitation to explore themes of an interconnected universe. A new pentominoes code appears in the narrative, and Helquist likewise embeds another challenge in his drawings (unfinished in the galley). --Jennifer Mattson Copyright 2006 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

This third book in DuPrau's series is billed as a prequel to the first two (The City of Ember and The People of Sparks), but the connection is tenuous. Eleven-year-old Nickie Randolph wants "to do something helpful for the world," which is on the brink of war. Fear of terrorist activity is wreaking havoc in American cities. Against this backdrop, Nickie and her aunt travel from Philadelphia to Yonwood, in the North Carolina mountains, to prepare Nickie's great-grandfather's home for sale. Yonwood is a tense, parochial town, where the fevered ramblings of an older woman have been seized upon as "visions," and the woman hailed as a prophet. Local busybody Brenda Beeson, whose mantra is "one moldy strawberry can ruin the whole basket," zealously takes charge, interpreting the Prophet's messages and building a "shield of goodness" against impending evil. DuPrau scatters the text with intriguing elements-clues hidden in postcards, mysterious writings about "eleven dimensions" found in a journal-but they function more as entertaining distractions rather than to advance the story. DuPrau unfortunately undercuts the novel's more serious themes-the nature of goodness, and of God-with a manipulative, rather nonsensical denouement. But while the plot never fully ignites, the smooth writing will carry fans of the first two books along, and there's ample room (50 years) between this book and Ember for yet another prequel. Ages 8-12. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-8-With her distinct style, Balliett returns to Chicago and the detective work of Calder and Petra, sixth graders at the University School. This time they are joined by Tommy, Calder's former best friend who had moved away for a year. In this architectural mystery, destruction threatens Frank Lloyd Wright's Robie House, and the Wright 3, as the protagonists call themselves, piece together the puzzle that will lead to the building's rescue. While friction initially mars the three-sided friendship, Petra, Calder, and Tommy soon appreciate their individual roles in solving the mystery. Egged on by their unconventional teacher, the Wright 3 utilize Calder's geometric brain, Petra's writing and observing skills, and Tommy's uncanny findings to research and investigate the cryptic messages that Robie House seems to send in its own defense. Balliett elegantly wraps factual information on the building into a dreamy, Debussy sort of mystery in which seemingly random connections in everyday life uncover the hidden enigmas of Robie House and Wright himself. Balliett's atmospheric writing encourages readers to make their own journeys of discovery into art and architecture, creating a mystery subgenre that is as unique as it is compelling. While the book is not perfect-the final chapters jerk rather than flow, and the Wright 3's transition from awkward tolerance to a tightly knit cadre is nothing out of the ordinary-the mystery itself and the perfectly realized setting make this an essential purchase.-Caitlin Augusta, The Darien Library, CT (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.