Cover image for Gift from the sea
Title:
Gift from the sea
Author:
Lindberg, Anne Morrow, 1906-
Physical Description:
138 pages ; 21 cm
Language:
English
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9780679732419
Format :
Book

On Order

Summary

Summary

A great gift at any time of year.

In this inimitable classic, Anne Morrow Lindbergh shares her meditations on youth and age, love and marriage, peace, solitude, and contentment during a brief vacation by the sea.

Drawing inspiration from the the shells on the shore, Lindbergh's musings on the shape of a woman's life will bring new understanding to readers, male and family, at any stage of life. A mother of five and professional writer, she casts an unsentimental eye at the trappings of modern life that threaten to overwhelm us -- the timesaving gadgets that complicate our lives, the overcommitments that take us from our families -- and by recording her own thoughts in a brief escape from her everyday demands, she guides her readers to find a space for contemplation and creativity in their own lives. With great wisdom and insight she describes the shifting shapes of relationships and marriage, presenting a vision of a life lived in enduring and evolving partnership. A groundbreaking work when it was first published, this book has retained its freshness as it has been rediscovered by generations of readers and is no less current today.


Author Notes

Anne Morrow Linbergh, 1906-2001 Anne Morrow Lindbergh was born Anne Spencer Morrow on June 22, 1906 in Englewood New Jersey. Her father was a multimillionaire banker with the firm J.P.Morgan and Co., who would later become a senator for New Jersey. Her mother was an educator and poet who held the position of acting president of Smith College from 1939-1940. Anne Morrow attended Miss Chapin's School in Manhattan and graduated Smith College in 1928. She is best known for penning over two dozen books of prose and poetry, including five diaries of her tumultuous life.

Lindbergh married the famous Charles Lindbergh in 1929 and was introduced to the real world through his fame. Her childhood had been a sheltered one, yet she thrived in this new lifestyle. In 1930, she became the first woman to receive a glider pilot's license in the United States. That same year she accompanied her husband as copilot and navigator, when he broke the transatlantic speed record. In 1939 she earned the prestigious Hubbard Gold Medal of the National Geographic Society, becoming the first woman ever to do so. Ironically, Anne Lindbergh is best known not for her literary prowess, but for the kidnapping and death of her first born son, Charles Jr.. Known as the Crime of the Century, the Lindberghs gained an enormous amount of public recognition in the wake of the brutal murder. Lindbergh would never be the same for the incident.

In 1935, Lindbergh published her first book, which also became her first best seller. While sometimes criticized by the literary world, Lindbergh remained popular with the public, females in particular, until her death. Perhaps her most famous book, "Gift from the Sea", a philosophical meditation on women's lives, was an inspiration to those same women. Because of her sympathy to the plight of the every day woman, and their returned sympathy for her own tragedy, Lindbergh was voted one of the 10 most admired women of 1975 by readers of Good Housekeeping. Her later works, which included the somewhat questionable "The Wave of the Future" was placed under greater criticisms, yet survived as another example of her involvement in world events, as they touch home.

Anne Morrow Lindbergh died at the age of 94 at her home in Passumpsic, Vermont.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Norman Cousins wrote, ``There is in her books a respect for human response to beauty and for the great connections between humankind and nature.'' Hers is a positive view of life. (Jl 1 77)


Library Journal Review

Mrs. Lucky Lindy was no slouch herself: she was the first American woman to earn a first-class glider pilot's license, the first woman to win the National Geographic Society's Hubbard Medal for exploration, and a National Book Award-winning novelist. In this 1955 best seller, she discusses the challenges faced by women and offers inspiration. This 50th-anniversary edition has an intro by daughter Reeve. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

I began these pages for myself, in order to think out my own particular pattern of living, my own individual balance of life, work and human relationships. And since I think best with a pencil in my hand, I started naturally to write. I had the feeling, when the thoughts first clarified on paper, that my experience was very different from other people's. (Are we all under this illusion?) My situation had, in certain ways, more freedom than that of most people, and in certain other ways, much less. Besides, I thought, not all women are searching for a new pattern of living, or want a contemplative corner of their own. Many women are content with their lives as they are. They manage amazingly well, far better than I, it seemed to me, looking at their lives from the outside. With envy and admiration, I observed the porcelain perfection of their smoothly ticking days. Perhaps they had no problems, or had found the answers long ago. No, I decided, these discussions would have value and interest only for myself. But as I went on writing and simultaneously talking with other women, young and old, with different lives and experiences--those who supported themselves, those who wished careers, those who were hard-working housewives and mothers, and those with more ease--I found that my point of view was not unique. In varying settings and under different forms, I discovered that many women, and men too, were grappling with essentially the same questions as I, and were hungry to discuss and argue and hammer out possible answers. Even those whose lives had appeared to be ticking imperturbably under their smiling clock-faces were often trying, like me, to evolve another rhythm with more creative pauses in it, more adjustment to their individual needs, and new and more alive relationships to themselves as well as others. And so gradually, these chapters, fed by conversations, arguments and revelations from men and women of all groups, became more than my individual story, until I decided in the end to give them back to the people who had shared and stimulated many of these thoughts. Here, then, with my warm feelings of gratitude and companionship for those working along the same lines, I return my gift from the sea. Excerpted from Gift from the Sea by Anne Morrow Lindbergh All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.