Cover image for Rosemary's witch
Title:
Rosemary's witch
Author:
Turner, Ann Warren.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York, NY : HarperCollins Publishers, [1991]

©1991
Physical Description:
164 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Summary:
After moving into an old house in a small New England town, 9-year-old Rosemary discovers that the nearby woods conceal a 150-year-old witch, who once lived in the house and is using her magic to take it back.
General Note:
"A Charlotte Zolotow book."
Language:
English
Reading Level:
600 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 4.1 4.0 6396.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 6.1 6 Quiz: 09850.
ISBN:
9780060261276

9780060261283
Format :
Book

On Order

Summary

Summary

After moving into an old house in a small New England town, 9-year-old Rosemary discovers that the nearby woods conceal a 150-year-old witch, who once lived in the house and is using her magic to take it back.


Summary

After moving into an old house in a small New England town, 9-year-old Rosemary discovers that the nearby woods conceal a 150-year-old witch, who once lived in the house and is using her magic to take it back.


Author Notes

Ann Warren Turner was born in December 1945. She is an American poet and children's author. Her poetry works include Tickle a Pickle, Street Talk, Mississippi Mud, and Learning to Swim: a Memoir. Her picture books include Dakota Dugout, When Mr. Jefferson Came to Philadelphia: What I Learned of Freedom, Pumpkin Cat, and Sitting Bull Remembers. her novels include: A Hunter Comes Home, Rosemary's Witch, and Hard Hit. She has also won first prize in 1967 from The Atlantic Monthly college creative writing contest and first prize in 1991 from the National Council for the Social Studies for Through the Stars ansd Night Skies.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Ann Warren Turner was born in December 1945. She is an American poet and children's author. Her poetry works include Tickle a Pickle, Street Talk, Mississippi Mud, and Learning to Swim: a Memoir. Her picture books include Dakota Dugout, When Mr. Jefferson Came to Philadelphia: What I Learned of Freedom, Pumpkin Cat, and Sitting Bull Remembers. her novels include: A Hunter Comes Home, Rosemary's Witch, and Hard Hit. She has also won first prize in 1967 from The Atlantic Monthly college creative writing contest and first prize in 1991 from the National Council for the Social Studies for Through the Stars ansd Night Skies.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

Gr. 5-8. The glow of family togetherness always seems brighter when there's a dark storm outside. Nine-year-old Rosemary Morgenthau and her happy family are ecstatic about their move into a rambling old country house. At the same time, 150-year-old Mathilda, a wild and sorrowful witch, wants them out of there. She was a bitterly unhappy child in that house, and the village drove her out. Now she's come back, sad and mean, with the power to take back what was hers. As bad things begin to happen to the Morgenthaus--beloved objects disappear, the weather turns fierce, a sinister cat arrives, a plague of toads invades the village--Rosemary finds the courage to reach out to the lonely witch and to imagine what it's like to feel so dark and hopeless, with "something black and fierce and vengeful" threatening to overwhelm you. Turner's lyrical story weaves the two opposites--the haggard outcast and the protected child--closer and closer together with an unsettling mix of menace and love. ~--Hazel Rochman


Publisher's Weekly Review

The Morgenthaus seem content with their new house, but nine-year-old Rosemary feels a chill. Then she discovers that the house is haunted by the spirit of a girl named Mathilda. Neglected and never loved, Mathilda's hurt and anger has somehow denatured her; at age 150, she is a heinous witch. Rosemary explores this mystery and appeases Mathilda with presents, including her own beloved teddy bear. Certain elements linger unpleasantly--in particular, the message that a girl's rightful pain and rage will turn her into an evil witch is coercive and sexist. Additionally, readers may feel cheated when Rosemary's sacrifice of her teddy bear is erased after the witch inexplicably returns the gift. The book's spooky atmosphere, however, compensates for a somewhat opaque and slow-moving style. Ages 11-up. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-6-- Rosemary is delighted when her family moves from crowded quarters in Garden City to a large New England farmhouse. But Rosemary is puzzled by the sad face drawn among the wallpaper flowers of her new room. Treasured objects begin to disappear; a chilling fog arrives in July; and a plague of toads causes the small rural community to rumble with fear and speculation. Only nine-year-old Rosemary has the ability to perceive what is happening. A chanteuse of a storyteller, Turner uses poetic prose to caress the plot while keeping the tension turned high. Alternating the viewpoints of Rosemary and the witch who is causing the trouble allows the story to evolve in an unusual manner. Turner's splendid descriptive ability depicts a beautifully detailed landscape, the social exchanges of a small town, and a most nauseating witch. Character development is superb. In a believable way, insecure Rosemary gathers the courage to grapple with the 150-year-old woman's confused and malevolent thoughts. This courage, in turn, enables Rosemary to claim a place in her loving, yet competitive, family. Even the witch becomes a sympathetic figure as Rosemary leads her and readers to understand that home is not a collection of things, but rather warmth, company, and emotional comfort.-- Cindy Darling Codell, Belmont Junior High School, Winchester, KY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 5-8. The glow of family togetherness always seems brighter when there's a dark storm outside. Nine-year-old Rosemary Morgenthau and her happy family are ecstatic about their move into a rambling old country house. At the same time, 150-year-old Mathilda, a wild and sorrowful witch, wants them out of there. She was a bitterly unhappy child in that house, and the village drove her out. Now she's come back, sad and mean, with the power to take back what was hers. As bad things begin to happen to the Morgenthaus--beloved objects disappear, the weather turns fierce, a sinister cat arrives, a plague of toads invades the village--Rosemary finds the courage to reach out to the lonely witch and to imagine what it's like to feel so dark and hopeless, with "something black and fierce and vengeful" threatening to overwhelm you. Turner's lyrical story weaves the two opposites--the haggard outcast and the protected child--closer and closer together with an unsettling mix of menace and love. ~--Hazel Rochman


Publisher's Weekly Review

The Morgenthaus seem content with their new house, but nine-year-old Rosemary feels a chill. Then she discovers that the house is haunted by the spirit of a girl named Mathilda. Neglected and never loved, Mathilda's hurt and anger has somehow denatured her; at age 150, she is a heinous witch. Rosemary explores this mystery and appeases Mathilda with presents, including her own beloved teddy bear. Certain elements linger unpleasantly--in particular, the message that a girl's rightful pain and rage will turn her into an evil witch is coercive and sexist. Additionally, readers may feel cheated when Rosemary's sacrifice of her teddy bear is erased after the witch inexplicably returns the gift. The book's spooky atmosphere, however, compensates for a somewhat opaque and slow-moving style. Ages 11-up. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-6-- Rosemary is delighted when her family moves from crowded quarters in Garden City to a large New England farmhouse. But Rosemary is puzzled by the sad face drawn among the wallpaper flowers of her new room. Treasured objects begin to disappear; a chilling fog arrives in July; and a plague of toads causes the small rural community to rumble with fear and speculation. Only nine-year-old Rosemary has the ability to perceive what is happening. A chanteuse of a storyteller, Turner uses poetic prose to caress the plot while keeping the tension turned high. Alternating the viewpoints of Rosemary and the witch who is causing the trouble allows the story to evolve in an unusual manner. Turner's splendid descriptive ability depicts a beautifully detailed landscape, the social exchanges of a small town, and a most nauseating witch. Character development is superb. In a believable way, insecure Rosemary gathers the courage to grapple with the 150-year-old woman's confused and malevolent thoughts. This courage, in turn, enables Rosemary to claim a place in her loving, yet competitive, family. Even the witch becomes a sympathetic figure as Rosemary leads her and readers to understand that home is not a collection of things, but rather warmth, company, and emotional comfort.-- Cindy Darling Codell, Belmont Junior High School, Winchester, KY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.