Cover image for From map to museum : uncovering mysteries of the past
Title:
From map to museum : uncovering mysteries of the past
Author:
Anderson, Joan.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Morrow Junior Books, 1988.
Physical Description:
63 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm
Summary:
Describes an archaeological dig off the coast of Georgia, the methods used to uncover artifacts there, and what was learned about a mission run there by the Spanish for the Guale Indians.
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
1170 Lexile.
Program Information:
Reading Counts RC 6-8 6.2 3 Quiz: 04269 Guided reading level: NR.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780688069148

9780688069155
Format :
Book

On Order

Summary

Summary

Describes an archaeological dig off the coast of Georgia, the methods used to uncover artifacts there, and what was learned about a mission run there by the Spanish for the Guale Indians.


Summary

Describes an archaeological dig off the coast of Georgia, the methods used to uncover artifacts there, and what was learned about a mission run there by the Spanish for the Guale Indians.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Gr. 4-6. Those who have poked around a museum and wondered about the stories behind the artifacts will find some of their questions answered here. Dr. David Hurst Thomas, the curator of anthropology at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, is the focal point of this photo essay. When Thomas learns that there has been renewed interest in a Spanish mission populated by Guale Indians off the Georgia coast, he heads down to explore. What follows is a description of the careful work that goes on as an archaeological site is uncovered and studied. First comes the mapping, then the digging, both helped through modern technology. But it takes people such as Thomas to make sense of the diverse finds. Although the writing is somewhat dry in parts, the many black-and-white photographs and diagrams compensate. Children researching the subject for reports or those interested in the topic should find this meets their needs; teachers can also use it to spark classroom units. IC.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-7 The stories of Howard Carter breaching the wall of Tutankhamen's tomb or Heinrich Schliemann unearthing ``Priam's'' gold have fired the imagination of many young readers, but modern archaeology is more likely to be made up of thorough, tedious investigation using technologically advanced methods. The results may seem less dramatic, but a more complete picture of how people carried on their lives often emerges from this kind of work. This is a description of a dig on St. Catherine's Island, Ga., searching for the remains of a 16th-Century Spanish mission. Anderson's emphasis on the painstaking science involved will help readers understand the difficulties in this kind of research, but little space is devoted to a reconstruction of what life must have been like on the island. The artifacts unearthed remain lifeless and unconnected to their former owners. No imaginative leap of writing is to be found here. The black-and-white photographs and drawings are helpful in understanding how the dig was conducted, but not in understanding its ultimate significance. David N. Pauli, Northern Waters Library Service, Ashland, Wis. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 4-6. Those who have poked around a museum and wondered about the stories behind the artifacts will find some of their questions answered here. Dr. David Hurst Thomas, the curator of anthropology at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, is the focal point of this photo essay. When Thomas learns that there has been renewed interest in a Spanish mission populated by Guale Indians off the Georgia coast, he heads down to explore. What follows is a description of the careful work that goes on as an archaeological site is uncovered and studied. First comes the mapping, then the digging, both helped through modern technology. But it takes people such as Thomas to make sense of the diverse finds. Although the writing is somewhat dry in parts, the many black-and-white photographs and diagrams compensate. Children researching the subject for reports or those interested in the topic should find this meets their needs; teachers can also use it to spark classroom units. IC.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-7 The stories of Howard Carter breaching the wall of Tutankhamen's tomb or Heinrich Schliemann unearthing ``Priam's'' gold have fired the imagination of many young readers, but modern archaeology is more likely to be made up of thorough, tedious investigation using technologically advanced methods. The results may seem less dramatic, but a more complete picture of how people carried on their lives often emerges from this kind of work. This is a description of a dig on St. Catherine's Island, Ga., searching for the remains of a 16th-Century Spanish mission. Anderson's emphasis on the painstaking science involved will help readers understand the difficulties in this kind of research, but little space is devoted to a reconstruction of what life must have been like on the island. The artifacts unearthed remain lifeless and unconnected to their former owners. No imaginative leap of writing is to be found here. The black-and-white photographs and drawings are helpful in understanding how the dig was conducted, but not in understanding its ultimate significance. David N. Pauli, Northern Waters Library Service, Ashland, Wis. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.