Cover image for The Apple Corps guide to the well-built house
Title:
The Apple Corps guide to the well-built house
Author:
Locke, Jim.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Boston : Houghton Mifflin, 1988.
Physical Description:
xii, 276 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
General Note:
"A Richard Todd Book."

Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780395478080

9780395430422
Format :
Book

On Order

Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Move over Bob Vilas, here's carpenter and contractor Locke to advise on planning and building a new home. Locke and his Apple Corps partners constructed the home in Tracy Kidder's House [BKL Ag 85], and now they offer their professional advice on how to plan and build a house that will both last and be a pleasure to live in. Locke's concern for solid quality is evident-- his disdain for shabby technique and poor materials is best expressed in his derisive term ``cobby''-- and he tells the reader how to recognize top-notch construction from the cost-saving, slipshod products that are rampant in the building industry. Locke's advice covers every stage of the project, from the initial decisions on what and where to build, to consultations with architects and contractors, to the actual process of building and finishing a home. All the legal and financial consequences involved are also capably covered. While the book is mainly concerned with new construction, many suggestions and ideas for remodeling can also be gained from reading this engagingly practical and wise manual. Index. JB.


Publisher's Weekly Review

In this invaluable primer for anyone planning to work with professional builders on a new house or a renovation, Locke (quixotic Apple Corps builder in Tracy Kidder's House ) addresses the needs of those who want a sturdy and attractive house but tremble at the intricacies, risks and innumerable decisions required. He reasons that a well-built house is the only kind worth building, and explains how to build it, from choosing a conscientious builder to detailed finish work. Drawing on his own experience, Locke frankly recommends products and techniques for each stage of the process. Though some biases may be disputed by other builders, and some are best suited to New England, Locke explains his preferences and discusses all options so the consumer can make informed choices. Essential reading for prospective home builders, Locke's lively guide is a pleasure to read: principled, accurate, graceful, humorous. Informal drawings clarify technical details. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Booklist Review

Move over Bob Vilas, here's carpenter and contractor Locke to advise on planning and building a new home. Locke and his Apple Corps partners constructed the home in Tracy Kidder's House [BKL Ag 85], and now they offer their professional advice on how to plan and build a house that will both last and be a pleasure to live in. Locke's concern for solid quality is evident-- his disdain for shabby technique and poor materials is best expressed in his derisive term ``cobby''-- and he tells the reader how to recognize top-notch construction from the cost-saving, slipshod products that are rampant in the building industry. Locke's advice covers every stage of the project, from the initial decisions on what and where to build, to consultations with architects and contractors, to the actual process of building and finishing a home. All the legal and financial consequences involved are also capably covered. While the book is mainly concerned with new construction, many suggestions and ideas for remodeling can also be gained from reading this engagingly practical and wise manual. Index. JB.


Publisher's Weekly Review

In this invaluable primer for anyone planning to work with professional builders on a new house or a renovation, Locke (quixotic Apple Corps builder in Tracy Kidder's House ) addresses the needs of those who want a sturdy and attractive house but tremble at the intricacies, risks and innumerable decisions required. He reasons that a well-built house is the only kind worth building, and explains how to build it, from choosing a conscientious builder to detailed finish work. Drawing on his own experience, Locke frankly recommends products and techniques for each stage of the process. Though some biases may be disputed by other builders, and some are best suited to New England, Locke explains his preferences and discusses all options so the consumer can make informed choices. Essential reading for prospective home builders, Locke's lively guide is a pleasure to read: principled, accurate, graceful, humorous. Informal drawings clarify technical details. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved