Cover image for Better than a brother
Title:
Better than a brother
Author:
McCall, Edith S.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Walker, 1988.
Physical Description:
viii, 133 pages ; 22 cm
Summary:
The adventures of a young girl growing up at the turn of the century on the shores of Lake Monona in Madison, Wisconsin, where her family runs a boarding house for ice cutters.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Reading Counts RC 6-8 9 7 Quiz: 01169 Guided reading level: NR.
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9780802767820

9780802767837

9780802767844
Format :
Book

On Order

Summary

Summary

The adventures of a young girl growing up at the turn of the century on the shores of Lake Monona in Madison, Wisconsin, where her family runs a boarding house for ice cutters.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Gr. 4-6. McCall's period piece is inspired by family stories about her grandmother, whose namesake in the story is 13-year-old Hughie Riley. It's the turn of the century, and Hughie lives with her family on the shores of Lake Monona in Madison, Wisconsin. They live rent-free in their rambling home in exchange for boarding the work crew that comes each winter to cut ice for the Knickerbocker Ice Company. The story centers on Hughie's first romance, which seems doomed for quite awhile, and on the loss of her treasured locket, which is found by a lecherous crew member who tries to trade sex for its return. The character of Hughie is appealing, and her experiences, whether pitching in to help at home or racing ice boats with her brothers, allow McCall an unobtrusive venue for portraying the times. The story's plot, however, is weak, and both the villain and Hughie's rival for the boy she likes are barely more than cardboard figures. Despite its problems this story has enough color and interest to sustain readers to its conclusion. DMW. Family life-Fiction / Wisconsin-Fiction [CIP] 87-27369


School Library Journal Review

Gr 6-9 A small slice of past timeDecember 1899 to February 1900is warmly illuminated by McCall's fictional recounting of events from her mother's childhood on Lake Monona, Wisconsin. When 13-year-old Hughie, oldest of the six Riley children, loses her new gold locket while tussling in the snow, she is very upset. The difficulty of finding it turns to threat when Cass, a mean ice worker whom all the children fear, tells Hughie he has her locket and promises to give it back only in return for veiled favors. She turns for help to Jerry, a friend who considers her ``as good as a brother.'' The story starts slowly but gains momentum with Hughie's near disastrous encounter with Cass. Details of life at the turn of the century are described clearly in a manner reminiscent of Wilder's ``Little House'' books (all Harper). Romance buds as Hughie discovers Jerry a better confidante and companion than her brothers. With Valentine's Day not far away, Jerry concedes that Hughie too is Better Than a Brother. McCall's practiced hand makes this appealing title accessible to adolescents with limited reading skills. Katharine Bruner, Brown Middle School, Harrison, Tenn. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 4-6. McCall's period piece is inspired by family stories about her grandmother, whose namesake in the story is 13-year-old Hughie Riley. It's the turn of the century, and Hughie lives with her family on the shores of Lake Monona in Madison, Wisconsin. They live rent-free in their rambling home in exchange for boarding the work crew that comes each winter to cut ice for the Knickerbocker Ice Company. The story centers on Hughie's first romance, which seems doomed for quite awhile, and on the loss of her treasured locket, which is found by a lecherous crew member who tries to trade sex for its return. The character of Hughie is appealing, and her experiences, whether pitching in to help at home or racing ice boats with her brothers, allow McCall an unobtrusive venue for portraying the times. The story's plot, however, is weak, and both the villain and Hughie's rival for the boy she likes are barely more than cardboard figures. Despite its problems this story has enough color and interest to sustain readers to its conclusion. DMW. Family life-Fiction / Wisconsin-Fiction [CIP] 87-27369


School Library Journal Review

Gr 6-9 A small slice of past timeDecember 1899 to February 1900is warmly illuminated by McCall's fictional recounting of events from her mother's childhood on Lake Monona, Wisconsin. When 13-year-old Hughie, oldest of the six Riley children, loses her new gold locket while tussling in the snow, she is very upset. The difficulty of finding it turns to threat when Cass, a mean ice worker whom all the children fear, tells Hughie he has her locket and promises to give it back only in return for veiled favors. She turns for help to Jerry, a friend who considers her ``as good as a brother.'' The story starts slowly but gains momentum with Hughie's near disastrous encounter with Cass. Details of life at the turn of the century are described clearly in a manner reminiscent of Wilder's ``Little House'' books (all Harper). Romance buds as Hughie discovers Jerry a better confidante and companion than her brothers. With Valentine's Day not far away, Jerry concedes that Hughie too is Better Than a Brother. McCall's practiced hand makes this appealing title accessible to adolescents with limited reading skills. Katharine Bruner, Brown Middle School, Harrison, Tenn. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.