Cover image for Farewell, summer
Title:
Farewell, summer
Author:
Santmyer, Helen Hooven, 1895-1986.
Publication Information:
Thorndike, Me. : Thorndike Press, [1988]

©1988
Physical Description:
177 pages ; 22 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780896211742
Format :
Book

On Order

Summary

Author Notes

Helen Hooven Santmyer was born on November 25, 1895 in Xenia, Ohio. She attended both Wellesley College and Oxford University and was active in the struggle for women's rights. During her life, she has worked as a writer, an English professor, a librarian, and a dean of women. She is the author of And Ladies of the Club (1984), which was published when she was 88 years old. Her other works include Early Promise, Late Reward; Herbs and Apples; Ohio Town; and The Fierce Dispute. Early Promise, Late Reward tells the story of a small town Midwestern girl who was educated at Wellesley and became one of the first female Rhodes Scholars. She died on February 21, 1986 and was inducted into the Ohio Women's Hall of Fame in 1996.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

Written shortly before the bestselling . . . And Ladies of the Club, this slim novel tells, in the leisurely, old-fashioned style that has endeared Santmyer to many readers, about an ill-fated love affair that occurred in the town of Sunbury, Ohio, one summer, long ago. Damaris, a high-spirited beauty, returns home from a convent school and announces she wants to become a nun, an unthinkable idea to her Dutch Presbyterian family. Her cousin Steve, a dreamy young man who yearns to be a poet, comes to Sunbury after his father's death to seek his fortune. The inevitable happens. The two young people, with some encouragement from Damaris's grandfather, begin a flirtation. Steve falls hard, but is caught short by Damaris's shrewd assessment of their personalities: ``We need anchors. Together we'd be driftwood.'' The story leads to an inevitable, disastrous conclusion. This slight, melancholic tale is more successful than Herbs and Apples, less so, of course, than Santmyer's life work ``. . . And Ladies.'' The author shines in her loving recollections of turn-of-the-century Ohio and her exploration of the ties that bindand breakfamilies. (April) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved