Cover image for Living in the tropics
Title:
Living in the tropics
Author:
Hintz, Martin.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : F. Watts, 1987.
Physical Description:
93 pages : illustrations, maps ; 29 cm.
Summary:
Describes the climate, geography, and cultures of Sri Lanka, Ghana, and Columbia, and indicates how tropic conditions affect life in such regions.
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9780531101513
Format :
Book

On Order

Summary

Summary

Describes the climate, geography, and cultures of Sri Lanka, Ghana, and Columbia, and indicates how tropic conditions affect life in such regions.


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Gr. 6-8. These four titles use a cultural geography approach to examine life-styles that have evolved in polar regions, deserts, the tropics, and islands. The intent is not to make analyses that automatically extend to other groups living in similar situations, which would be invalid, but to show the extent to which culture and environment interact with each other. The first two titles, Living in Polar Regions and Living in Deserts, present penetrating looks at the peoples who live there. Cheney examines the contrasting lives of the Inuit of Barrow, Alaska; the Russian and Yakaghir natives of Cherskiy, Siberia, USSR; and the Cree and Inuit residents of the Great Whale River region in the Canadian Arctic. What is notable is the frankness of the author's examinations, which describe environmental and cultural problems as well as the simple facts of existence in a cold climate. Currimbhoy is similarly forthright in her in-depth look at desert dwellers in the African Sahel, Australia's western desert, and in Chile's Norte Grande, where copper mining is a mainstay. The remaining two titles, Living in the Tropics and Living on Islands, follow the series outline by surveying three areas and cultures, but with much less depth. In describing Colombia, South America, for example, Hintz' Tropics makes no mention of the drug trade that is associated with certain regions, and in Markl's Islands, some descriptions read like a travelogue. Regardless, these latter two titles clearly make their points about the environmental-cultural interrelationship; all four volumes will be useful adjuncts to classroom geography units. DMW.