Cover image for The land of Oz : being an account of the further adventures of the Scarecrow and Tin Woodman and also the Pumpkinhead, the Animated Saw-horse and the Gump; the story being a sequel to The Wizard of Oz
Title:
The land of Oz : being an account of the further adventures of the Scarecrow and Tin Woodman and also the Pumpkinhead, the Animated Saw-horse and the Gump; the story being a sequel to The Wizard of Oz
Author:
Baum, L. Frank (Lyman Frank), 1856-1919.
Physical Description:
273 pages : illustrations ; 18 cm.
General Note:
A Del Rey book.
Language:
English
Subject Term:
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780345282248
Format :
Book

On Order

Summary

Summary

Book 2 of L. Frank Baum's immortal OZ series, in which young Tip runs away from his guardian, the witch Mombi, taking with him Jack Pumpkinhead and the wooden Saw-Horse, and flees to the Emerald City where he learns the incredible secret of his past.


Author Notes

Best known as the author of the Wizard of Oz series, Lyman Frank Baum was born on May 15, 1856, in New York. When Baum was a young man, his father, who had made a fortune in oil, gave him several theaters in New York and Pennsylvania to manage. Eventually, Baum had his first taste of success as a writer when he staged The Maid of Arran, a melodrama he had written and scored.

Married in 1882 to Maud Gage, whose mother was an influential suffragette, the two had four sons. Baum often entertained his children with nursery rhymes and in 1897 published a compilation titled Mother Goose in Prose, which was illustrated by Maxfield Parrish. The project was followed by three other picture books of rhymes, illustrated by William Wallace Denslow.

The success of the nursery rhymes persuaded Baum to craft a novel out of one of the stories, which he titled The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Some critics have suggested that Baum modeled the character of the Wizard on himself. Other books for children followed the original Oz book, and Baum continued to produce the popular Oz books until his death in 1919. The series was so popular that after Baum's death and by special arrangement, Oz books continued to be written for the series by other authors. Glinda of Oz, the last Oz book that Baum wrote, was published in 1920.

(Bowker Author Biography)