Cover image for Power and the division of labour
Title:
Power and the division of labour
Author:
Rueschemeyer, Dietrich.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, 1986.
Physical Description:
viii, 260 pages ; 22 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780804713245

9780804713252
Format :
Book

On Order

Reviews 2

Choice Review

In this valuable work in sociological theory, Rueschemeyer, (Brown University) attacks the idea contained in many theories of modernization that new forms of the division of labor appear because they lead to greater efficiency. He objects to the omission of power in this theory, arguing that changes in the division of labor do not happen by themselves. They result from decisions that powerful groups make when they introduce changes, and such decisions are made to advance the interests of these groups. Efficiency by itself, therefore, is not an explanation. It must at least include an answer to the question, efficiency for whom? The author develops this theme through several variations, drawing many useful ideas from Marx and Weber, and showing in a variety of political, industrial, and professional cases how changes in the division of labor (including dedifferentiation) have resulted from the power struggles of groups acting within the institutional constraints of their time and place. Both specialists, and upper-division undergraduates studying modernization for the first time, will benefit.-R.W. Avery, University of Pittsburgh


Choice Review

In this valuable work in sociological theory, Rueschemeyer, (Brown University) attacks the idea contained in many theories of modernization that new forms of the division of labor appear because they lead to greater efficiency. He objects to the omission of power in this theory, arguing that changes in the division of labor do not happen by themselves. They result from decisions that powerful groups make when they introduce changes, and such decisions are made to advance the interests of these groups. Efficiency by itself, therefore, is not an explanation. It must at least include an answer to the question, efficiency for whom? The author develops this theme through several variations, drawing many useful ideas from Marx and Weber, and showing in a variety of political, industrial, and professional cases how changes in the division of labor (including dedifferentiation) have resulted from the power struggles of groups acting within the institutional constraints of their time and place. Both specialists, and upper-division undergraduates studying modernization for the first time, will benefit.-R.W. Avery, University of Pittsburgh