Cover image for Tough decisions : a casebook in medical ethics
Title:
Tough decisions : a casebook in medical ethics
Author:
Freeman, John Mark.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Oxford University Press, 1987.
Physical Description:
181 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780195042559

9780195042566
Format :
Book

On Order

Summary

Summary

Tough Decisions presents many of the complex medical-ethical issues likely to confront practitioners in critical situations. Through fictional but true-to-life cases, vividly described in clinical terms, the authors force the reader to choose among different courses of action and to confront a range of possible consequences. A two-year-old has been diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor. Who should be allowed to make decisions about the child's surgery and subsequent therapy, and on what basis? A family history of Huntington's disease emerges when a fiancee seeks genetic counseling. Who should be informed? An elderly patient suffers a cardiac arrest. Should "do-not-resuscitate" orders always be followed? How should legal liability affect medical decisions?
Other ethical issues considered include surgical complications, patient autonomy, rights of the retarded, informed consent, euthanasia, and the fair allocation of finite resources. Each case presented conveys the drama and pressure of weighing alternatives, and the realistic consequences of the choices made. The authors show that ethical decision-making is not limited to "matters of life and death", and that it is not the decision but the ethical process by which it is made that gives the decision moral integrity. With realistic detail, Tough Decisions brings to life and makes the student share in the many complexities of ethical decision-making when the health and lives of patients are at stake.


Summary

Tough Decisions presents many of the complex medical-ethical issues likely to confront practitioners in critical situations. Through fictional but true-to-life cases, vividly described in clinical terms, the authors force the reader to choose among different courses of action and to confront a range of possible consequences. A two-year-old has been diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor. Who should be allowed to make decisions about the child's surgery and subsequent therapy, and on what basis? A family history of Huntington's disease emerges when a fiancee seeks genetic counseling. Who should be informed? An elderly patient suffers a cardiac arrest. Should "do-not-resuscitate" orders always be followed? How should legal liability affect medical decisions?
Other ethical issues considered include surgical complications, patient autonomy, rights of the retarded, informed consent, euthanasia, and the fair allocation of finite resources. Each case presented conveys the drama and pressure of weighing alternatives, and the realistic consequences of the choices made. The authors show that ethical decision-making is not limited to "matters of life and death", and that it is not the decision but the ethical process by which it is made that gives the decision moral integrity. With realistic detail, Tough Decisions brings to life and makes the student share in the many complexities of ethical decision-making when the health and lives of patients are at stake.


Table of Contents

1 Should a patient's request not to be resuscitated always be followed?Maggie
2 Can a father refuse treatment of his toddler's brain tumor?Monica
3 Who will care for this 83-year-old after his cataract surgery?Leroy
4 Who should be moved from the crowded ICU to make space for new patients?Joey, Jessica and Roger, Tom and Marti
5 Who should decide to stop treatment? When and how?Tom Revisited
6 Should a quadriplegic 12-year-old be allowed to give up?Marti Revisited
7 What about Euthanasia?Edgar Jones
8 Sterilization: What are the rights of the retarded?Rebecca
9 Decision-making for a child with spina bifidaChristie
10 The Smyth Saga: Risks of a view of the future for a family with Huntington's disease
11 Is a baboon heart transplant research or innovative therapy - and does it matter?Baby James
12 After you've begun treating a newborn, when can you stop?Castelli
13 Is a baby without a brain a person?Amanda
14 Ethical Theory and Medical Ethics
15 Making Good Decisions
1 Should a patient's request not to be resuscitated always be followed?Maggie
2 Can a father refuse treatment of his toddler's brain tumor?Monica
3 Who will care for this 83-year-old after his cataract surgery?Leroy
4 Who should be moved from the crowded ICU to make space for new patients?Joey, Jessica and Roger, Tom and Marti
5 Who should decide to stop treatment? When and how?Tom Revisited
6 Should a quadriplegic 12-year-old be allowed to give up?Marti Revisited
7 What about Euthanasia?Edgar Jones
8 Sterilization: What are the rights of the retarded?Rebecca
9 Decision-making for a child with spina bifidaChristie
10 The Smyth Saga: Risks of a view of the future for a family with Huntington's disease
11 Is a baboon heart transplant research or innovative therapy - and does it matter?Baby James
12 After you've begun treating a newborn, when can you stop?Castelli
13 Is a baby without a brain a person?Amanda
14 Ethical Theory and Medical Ethics
15 Making Good Decisions