Cover image for The home of man
Title:
The home of man
Author:
Ward, Barbara, 1914-1981.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Norton, [1976]

©1976
Physical Description:
xii, 297 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780393064087

9780393064209
Format :
Book

On Order

Summary

Summary

The economist and social theorist addresses the issues facing the 1976 United Nations Conference on Human Settlements, proposing plans for urban life in tomorrow's highly populated cities.


Summary

With her customary gift for imagery and unifying perception, the author moves deftly through the now familiar and frightening statistics of urban population flows, poverty lines, housing shortages, and resource limitations to offer an urgent but hopeful assessment of the possibilities for human settlement planned and designed for people. The Home of Man is at once philosophical and practical, making suggestions on such essential aspects of human settlements and land-use planning, shelter, transport, sanitation, and health. But above all, The Home of Man provides a means of grasping a subject that "includes everything" and gives coherence to a topic with boundless problems, necessities, and constraints.


Author Notes

British-born Barbara Ward was educated at the Sorbonne and Oxford, where she took first-class honors in philosophy, politics, and economics. In 1939 she joined the staff of the Economist, becoming foreign editor the following year. For four years, beginning in 1946, she served as a governor of the British Broadcasting Company. In the years that followed she was Carnegie Fellow and Visiting Scholar at Harvard, Albert Schweitzer Professor at Columbia, and a member of the Pontifical Commission of Justice and Peace. An outstanding authority on world political, social, and economic issues, Barbara Ward has written many books for the general reader. In her Five Ideas That Change the World (1959) the ideas are nationalism, industrialism, colonialism, communism, and internationalism. In another work, India and the West (1961), she defined the urgency of India's desperate economic requirements and outlined a specific program for their accomplishment. Of it Edward Weeks wrote in the Atlantic: "Ward's new book . . . is in many respects the most important she has ever written. The qualities which she brings to her writing---her gift for historical analysis, her explanation of difficult economic problems, and her reasonable faith in the initiative of the free world---were never more needed." The Rich Nations and the Poor Nations (1962), which President Lyndon Johnson remarked "excites and inspires me" and Adlai Stevenson found "exceedingly important," was described in the New York Times Book Review by Eric F. Goldman as "wondrously lucid, richly informed and trenchantly argued, tough-minded but never failing to assume that intelligence and will can move human society forward." (Bowker Author Biography)


British-born Barbara Ward was educated at the Sorbonne and Oxford, where she took first-class honors in philosophy, politics, and economics. In 1939 she joined the staff of the Economist, becoming foreign editor the following year. For four years, beginning in 1946, she served as a governor of the British Broadcasting Company. In the years that followed she was Carnegie Fellow and Visiting Scholar at Harvard, Albert Schweitzer Professor at Columbia, and a member of the Pontifical Commission of Justice and Peace. An outstanding authority on world political, social, and economic issues, Barbara Ward has written many books for the general reader. In her Five Ideas That Change the World (1959) the ideas are nationalism, industrialism, colonialism, communism, and internationalism. In another work, India and the West (1961), she defined the urgency of India's desperate economic requirements and outlined a specific program for their accomplishment. Of it Edward Weeks wrote in the Atlantic: "Ward's new book . . . is in many respects the most important she has ever written. The qualities which she brings to her writing---her gift for historical analysis, her explanation of difficult economic problems, and her reasonable faith in the initiative of the free world---were never more needed." The Rich Nations and the Poor Nations (1962), which President Lyndon Johnson remarked "excites and inspires me" and Adlai Stevenson found "exceedingly important," was described in the New York Times Book Review by Eric F. Goldman as "wondrously lucid, richly informed and trenchantly argued, tough-minded but never failing to assume that intelligence and will can move human society forward." (Bowker Author Biography)