Cover image for James Joyce and the revolution of the word
Title:
James Joyce and the revolution of the word
Author:
MacCabe, Colin.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Barnes & Noble Books, [1979]

©1979
Physical Description:
186 pages ; 23 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780064944380
Format :
Book

On Order

Summary

Summary

This second edition of Colin MacCabe's "James Joyce and the Revolution of the Word" reprints a classic critical text on Joyce and adds a wealth of new material which places the text in its political and historical context. The argument links politics and literature, sex and language, to provide an account of Joyce which places him continually in both Irish and European history.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

This second edition of MacCabe's 1979 work is a patchwork of the earlier book (CH, Feb'80), largely unchanged, to which MacCabe has added several articles he wrote in the 1980s and a lengthy introduction. The original edition deals with James Joyce's involvement in Leninist politics and the relationship in Joyce's thinking between language, sexuality, and anticolonialism. The new material adds pieces on the body and language in Finnegans Wake, Shakespeare, Walter Benjamin, and Joyce's nonrepresentational theory of realism. MacCabe's update of the first edition's detailed treatment of Joyce's politics constitutes one of the chief interests of this updated volume. The second edition also records MacCabe's disillusionment with Leninism and with the critical establishment of the 1960s (especially with F.R. Leavis). MacCabe's passionate belief in the value of film in literary studies is more fully elaborated in the revision. The bibliography is woefully outdated, with few entries later that 1983. Since most of the material is already available in print, libraries that own the first edition can get along nicely without the second. ^BSumming Up: Optional. Comprehensive collections only. P. D. O'Connor emeritus, St. Thomas Aquinas College


Table of Contents

Theoretical Preliminaries
The End of a Meta-Language: From George Eliot to Dubliners
The End of the Story:Stephen Heroand A Portrait
A Radical Separation of the Elements: The Distanciation of the Reader in Ulysses
City of Words
Streets of Dreams: The Voyage of Ulysses
A Political Reading of Finnegans Wake
Joyce's Politics
Joyce and Chomsky
The Voice of Esau
Joyce and Benjamin
Realism: Balzac and Bartes
Theoretical Preliminaries
The End of a Meta-Language: From George Eliot to Dubliners
The End of the Story:Stephen Heroand A Portrait
A Radical Separation of the Elements: The Distanciation of the Reader in Ulysses
City of Words
Streets of Dreams: The Voyage of Ulysses
A Political Reading ofFinnegans Wake
Joyce's Politics
Joyce and Chomsky
The Voice of Esau
Joyce and Benjamin
Realism: Balzac and Bartes

Google Preview