Cover image for The dawn of tantra
Title:
The dawn of tantra
Author:
Guenther, Herbert V.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
-- Boulder, Colo. : Shambhala ; [New York] : distributed by Random House, 1975.
Physical Description:
viii, 92 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm. --.
Language:
English
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9780877730583

9780877730590
Format :
Book

On Order

Summary

Summary

Westerners wanting to know about tantra-- particularly the Buddhist tantra of Tibet-- often find only speculation and fancy. Tibet has been shrouded in mystery, and " tantra" has been called upon to name every kind of esoteric fantasy. In "The Dawn of Tantra" the reader meets a Tibetan meditation master and a Western scholar, each of whose grasp of Buddhist tantra is real and unquestionable. This collaboration is both true to the intent of the ancient Tibetan teachings and relevant to contemporary Western life.


Author Notes

Chogyam Trungpa (February 29, 1939 -- April 4, 1987) was one of the most visibly active of the Tibetan Buddhist refugees to come to the West and to lay the foundation in Europe and North America for the study of the Tibetan traditions. Born the son of a farmer and considered the eleventh incarnation of Trungpa Tulku, he was given a traditional training in religious philosophy but in his teens had to be hidden from the invading Chinese.

Fleeing in 1959 when the Communists invaded Tibet, he ultimately moved to Great Britain, where he studied comparative religion at Oxford University and established a Tibetan meditation center in Scotland. He moved to the United States in 1970 and established the Buddhist university, Naropa, in Colorado. Naropa became the center for seminars, many of which he cotaught with prominent American artists, scholars, and scientists. Among his contributions are the translation of numerous Tibetan texts.

On September 28, 1986, he suffered cardiac arrest, requiring intensive care at the hospital, then at his home and finally, in mid-March 1987, back at the hospital, where he died on April 4, 1987.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Chogyam Trungpa (February 29, 1939 -- April 4, 1987) was one of the most visibly active of the Tibetan Buddhist refugees to come to the West and to lay the foundation in Europe and North America for the study of the Tibetan traditions. Born the son of a farmer and considered the eleventh incarnation of Trungpa Tulku, he was given a traditional training in religious philosophy but in his teens had to be hidden from the invading Chinese.

Fleeing in 1959 when the Communists invaded Tibet, he ultimately moved to Great Britain, where he studied comparative religion at Oxford University and established a Tibetan meditation center in Scotland. He moved to the United States in 1970 and established the Buddhist university, Naropa, in Colorado. Naropa became the center for seminars, many of which he cotaught with prominent American artists, scholars, and scientists. Among his contributions are the translation of numerous Tibetan texts.

On September 28, 1986, he suffered cardiac arrest, requiring intensive care at the hospital, then at his home and finally, in mid-March 1987, back at the hospital, where he died on April 4, 1987.

(Bowker Author Biography)