Cover image for Joan Nathan's Jewish holiday cookbook : revised and updated on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of the publication of the Jewish holiday kitchen
Title:
Joan Nathan's Jewish holiday cookbook : revised and updated on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of the publication of the Jewish holiday kitchen
Author:
Nathan, Joan.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition, Rev. and updated.
Publication Information:
New York : Schocken Books, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
xi, 532 pages ; 25 cm
General Note:
"... a cookbook that combines both the Jewish holiday kitchen and the Jewish holiday baker ... "--Pref.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780805242171
Format :
Book

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TX724 .N37 2004 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Jewish holidays are defined by food. Yet Jewish cooking is always changing, encompassing the flavors of the world, embracing local culinary traditions of every place in which Jews have lived and adapting them to Jewish observance. This collection, the culmination of Joan Nathan's decades of gathering Jewish recipes from around the world, is a tour through the Jewish holidays as told in food. For each holiday, Nathan presents menus from different cuisines--Moroccan, Russian, German, and contemporary American are just a few--that show how the traditions of Jewish food have taken on new forms around the world. There are dishes that you will remember from your mother's table and dishes that go back to the Second Temple, family recipes that you thought were lost and other families' recipes that you have yet to discover. Explaining their origins and the holidays that have shaped them, Nathan spices these delicious recipes with delightful stories about the people who have kept these traditions alive.

Try something exotic--Algerian Chicken Tagine with Quinces or Seven-Fruit Haroset from Surinam--or rediscover an American favorite like Pineapple Noodle Kugel or Charlestonian Broth with "Soup Bunch" and Matzah Balls. No matter what you select, this essential book, which combines and updates Nathan's classic cookbooks The Jewish Holiday Baker and The Jewish Holiday Kitchen with a new generation of recipes, will bring the rich variety and heritage of Jewish cooking to your table on the holidays and throughout the year.


Author Notes

Joan Nathan is the author of many books on Jewish food, including the award-winning Jewish Cooking in America, The Jewish Holiday Kitchen, and The Jewish Holiday Baker.

She lives in Washington, D.C.

(Bowker Author Biography) Joan Nathan lived in Israel for three years, where she worked for Mayor Teddy Kollek of Jerusalem. In addition to her several other books, she is the author of "Jewish Cooking in America", which won both the James Beard Award & the IACP/Julia Child Cookbook of the Year Award. She was the host of the nationally syndicated television series "Jewish Cooking in America with Joan Nathan", based on the book. Ms. Nathan lives in Washington, D.C.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

It has been 25 years since Nathan's Jewish Holiday Kitchen 0 was first published. This volume gathers recipes from that book and from the food writer's Jewish0 Holiday Baker0 (1997) for a celebratory revision. And what a collection it is: 400 recipes accompanied by personal commentary and culinary history passed down through generations of Jewish cooks. That's part of the charm here as readers learn that "eating fish symbolizes the hope of redemption for Israel" and other snippets of fact and folklore. Keyed mostly to eight major Jewish holidays-- from Shabbat to Shavuot--the recipes represent both eastern European and Sephardic traditions, and are nicely adapted for modern cooks: processors speed preparation, and ingredients such as packaged onion soup are occasionally used. There's even a recipe for "low-cholesterol challah." It's a tasty assortment for Jewish cooks but also for anyone interested in ethnic cuisine. --Stephanie Zvirin Copyright 2004 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Twenty-five years ago, Nathan published The Jewish Holiday Kitchen, a landmark work that juxtaposed recipes with oral histories. Although she acknowledges that the past quarter century has brought some changes to Jewish cooking?e.g., Kosher caterers are lightening their foods; ?young American superstar chefs? have come onto the scene; California wineries now produce award-winning kosher wines?Nathan still relies on traditional recipes, such as My Mother?s Brisket, Cabbage Strudel, Romanian Beet Borscht, Vegetable Kugels and Babka in her new volume. Revising and updating recipes from Holiday Kitchen and another previous work, The Jewish Holiday Baker, Nathan shares instructions for making nearly 400 dishes, dividing them by holiday: the Sabbath, Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, Sukkot, Hanukkah, Purim, Passover, Shavuot and the minor holidays. Lengthy introductions accompany each recipe, and Nathan?s ability to balance interesting tidbits with useful instructions make this a supremely worthwhile resource. She covers every cuisine of the Jewish tradition, from Central and Eastern European to Middle Eastern to American. (Sept. 1) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.


Library Journal Review

Not merely a revision of The Jewish Holiday Kitchen, first published 25 years ago, Nathan's big new book also includes recipes and material from The Jewish Holiday Baker and her numerous articles for the New York Times. The hundreds of recipes, representing both the Ashkenazic and the Sephardic traditions, come from Jewish communities all over the world: Moroccan Challah, Greek Leek Patties, Mexican Banana Cake, and Haroset from Surinam. There are regional and cultural variations of many recipesAfor example, in addition to the one from Surinam, there are also Egyptian, Venetian, Persian, and Yemenite harosets. Recipes are organized by holiday, from Rosh Hashanah to Shavuoth, with separate chapters on the Sabbath and "The Life Cycle," a selection of traditional dishes for events such as bar mitzvahs and weddings. Detailed, thoroughly researched head notes provide historical and religious context, and numerous boxes cover a wide variety of topics. Highly recommended. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

Ashkenazic Apple-Nut Haroset Makes 3 cups 6 McIntosh or Gala apples (2 pounds), peeled, cored, seeded, and coarsely chopped 2/3 cup chopped almonds 3 tablespoons sugar, or to taste 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon Grated zest of 1 lemon 4 tablespoons sweet red wine 1. Combine all the ingredients, mixing together thoroughly. Add a little more wine as needed. 2. Blend (you can use a food processor) until it reaches the desired consistency. (I like my haroset in large pieces, with a crunchy texture, but my husband's Polish family prefers theirs ground to a paste.) Chill. Passover Roast Lamb Serves 6-8 One 7-pound shoulder of lamb (see note below) Salt and pepper 1 clove garlic, cut in slivers 1/2 cup shredded celery leaves 1/3 cubed green pepper 2 tablespoons tomato sauce, or to taste 1. Preheat the over to 325 degrees. 2. Rub the met all over with salt and pepper. Place slivers of garlic in between the bone and the flesh. Place the meat on a rack in a roasting pan, surrounded by celery leaves and green pepper. 3. Allowing 20 minutes per pound, roast in the over. About 1 hour before it is done, smooth tomato sauce over the top of the lamb. This will make a crusty skin and all to the flavor of the gravy. 4. To make the gravy, first remove the lamb to a warm place and drain off all of the fat. Add a little water to the juices in the pan, leaving in the celery leaves and green pepper, and boil down on top of the stove. Serve with asparagus, roasted new potatoes, and mint jelly. NOTE: A leg of lamb is basically a kosher cut of meat, but it would be extremely laborious and costly for a butcher to cut the many veins in the hind legs of the animal for the blood to run out. For this reason, kosher butchers prefer to sell the shoulder cut. Excerpted from Joan Nathan's Jewish Holiday Cookbook by Joan Nathan All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Table of Contents

Ashkenazic Apple-Nut Haroset Makes 3 cups 6 McIntosh or Gala apples (2 pounds), peeled, cored, seeded, and coarsely chopped 2/3 cup chopped almonds 3 tablespoons sugar, or to taste 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon Grated zest of 1 lemon 4 tablespoons sweet red wine
1 Combine all the ingredients, mixing together thoroughly. Add a little more wine as needed.
2 Blend (you can use a food processor) until it reaches the desired consistency. (I like my haroset in large pieces, with a crunchy texture, but my husband's Polish family prefers theirs ground to a paste.) Chill.
Passover Roast Lamb Serves 6-8 One 7-pound shoulder of lamb (see note below) Salt and pepper 1 clove garlic, cut in slivers 1/2 cup shredded celery leaves 1/3 cubed green pepper 2 tablespoons tomato sauce, or to taste
1 Preheat the over to 325 degrees.
2 Rub the met all over with salt and pepper. Place slivers of garlic in between the bone and the flesh. Place the meat on a rack in a roasting pan, surrounded by celery leaves and green pepper.
3 Allowing 20 minutes per pound, roast in the over. About 1 hour before it is done, smooth tomato sauce over the top of the lamb. This will make a crusty skin and all to the flavor of the gravy.
4 To make the gravy, first remove the lamb to a warm place and drain off all of the fat. Add a little water to the juices in the pan, leaving in the celery leaves and green pepper, and boil down on top of the stove. Serve with asparagus, roasted new potatoes, and mint jelly. NOTE: A leg of lamb is basically a kosher cut of meat, but it would be extremely laborious and costly for a butcher to cut the many veins in the hind legs of the animal for the blood to run out. For this reason, kosher butchers prefer to sell the shoulder cut.