Cover image for Apples to Oregon : being the (slightly) true narative of how a brave pioneer father brought apples, peaches, pears, plums, grapes, and cherries (and children) across the Plains
Title:
Apples to Oregon : being the (slightly) true narative of how a brave pioneer father brought apples, peaches, pears, plums, grapes, and cherries (and children) across the Plains
Author:
Hopkinson, Deborah.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Atheneum Books for Young Readers, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 23 x 29 cm
Summary:
A pioneer father transports his beloved fruit trees and his family to Oregon in the mid-nineteenth century. Based loosely on the life of Henderson Luelling.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
Ages 2-5.

840 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 4.1 0.5 81197.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 5 3 Quiz: 35535 Guided reading level: M.
Genre:
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780689847691
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Apples, ho!
When Papa decides to pull up roots and move from Iowa to Oregon, he can't bear to leave his precious apple trees behind. Or his peaches, plums, grapes, cherries, and pears. Oh, and he takes his family along too. But the trail is cruel -- first there's a river to cross that's wider than Texas...and then there are hailstones as big as plums...and there's even a drought, sure to crisp the cherries. Those poor pippins! Luckily Delicious (the nonedible apple of Daddy's eye) is strong -- as young 'uns raised on apples are -- and won't let anything stop her father's darling saps from tasting the sweet Oregon soil.
Here's a hilarious tall tale -- from the team that brought you Fannie in the Kitchen -- that's loosely based on the life of a real fruiting pioneer.
Apple Facts
More than 7,500 varieties of apples are grown throughout the world.
About 2,500 varieties grow in the United States.
The apple variety Delicious is the most widely grown in the United States.
Apples are part of the rose family.
The science of fruit growing is called pomology.
Fresh apples float. That's because 25 percent of their volume is air.
Cut an apple in half, across the core, and you'll see a star shape.
It takes apple trees four to five years to produce their first fruit.
It takes about thirty-six apples to make one gallon of apple cider.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

K-Gr. 3. The pair that created Fannie in the Kitchen 0 (2001) offers another food-related picture book for youngsters. When Papa decides to move from Iowa to Oregon his biggest concern is not his family but his apples--and his peaches, plums, grapes, cherries, and pears! He constructs a dirt-filled wagon to transport his fruit saplings, while his family travels in a smaller cart. Along the way, they encounter the requisite Oregon Trail hardships, but luckily daughter Delicious is clever enough to help her family (and Papa's precious darlings) arrive safely at their new home. Based loosely on the life of Henderson Luelling, who founded Oregon's first nursery in 1847, Hopkinson's alliterative tall tale is rich in language that begs to be read out loud ("'Guard the grapes! Protect the peaches!' Daddy howled"), and Carpenter's colorful oil paintings add to the exaggerated fun. Some apple facts and a historical note are appended. --Kay Weisman Copyright 2004 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

The creators of Fannie in the Kitchen present another satisfying slice of Americana in this capricious caper, loosely based on a true story. "My daddy loved growin' apples. And when he got ready to pull up roots and leave Iowa for Oregon, he couldn't bear to leave his apple trees behind," states the vivacious young narrator, with the fitting name of Delicious. Her father builds two large wooden boxes, fills them with "good, wormy dirt" and fruit trees, and loads them onto a wagon. "Oh, and by the way, he took us along too," she adds. As the girl's colloquial account follows the family of 10 across country, Carpenter's oil paintings provide effervescent particulars, such as Daddy bowed out at the front of the wagon, leading the team of oxen, while Delicious, addressing the audience full-on, nearly misses her ride West. Carpenter's brushstrokes, both delicate and broad, plus her rubbery characters add up to a more rugged style than her fine line renderings in Fannie, yet the artwork conveys just as much humor. Youngsters will revel in the fact that it is only through the efforts of inventive and indefatigable Delicious that the precious cargo survives its journey-through hail, drought and frost-to Oregon, where father and daughter plant a successful orchard. Daddy has the delectable last word: "Delicious, you'll always be the apple of my eye." This tallish tale is sweet to the core. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 4-In this original tall tale, Delicious describes her family's journey from Iowa to Oregon in the 1800s. Daddy loves the idea of going west but he can't bear to leave his apple trees behind. He constructs two special wagons, fills them with "good, wormy dirt," and packs in hundreds of plants and trees. "Apples, ho!" he cries, and off they go. When they reach the Platte River-"wider than Texas, thicker than Momma's muskrat stew"-Delicious helps her father build a raft to ferry the seedlings-and the family-across. Everyone makes it to the other side, just barely. Before long, a hailstorm hits, scattering bonnets, petticoats, and even Daddy's drawers. Other larger-than-life challenges await the family, but inventive Delicious always manages to save the day. Soon, they're all floating down "the mighty Columbia." They plant those trees in Oregon soil, and everyone lives happily ever after. An author's note explains that this story is based loosely on Henderson Luelling, a pioneer who really did transport plants and fruit trees to Oregon in 1847. Hopkinson's version, of course, is just pure fun and make-believe. Carpenter's oil paintings are filled with vivid shades that reflect the changing scenery. Amusing details abound, and the slightly exaggerated humor of the pictures is in perfect balance with the tone of the text. The plucky heroine-wearing a bright red dress, white pinafore, and confident smile-often takes center stage. An entertaining choice for storytimes or an amusing supplement to units on westward expansion.-Roxanne Burg, Orange County Public Library, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.