Cover image for The Civil War art of Mort Künstler
Title:
The Civil War art of Mort Künstler
Author:
Künstler, Mort.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Seymour, CT : Greenwich Workshop Press, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
223 pages ; illustrations (mostly color) ; 29 cm
Language:
English
Personal Subject:
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780867130911
Format :
Book

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E468.7 .K84 2004 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

Mort Künstler, the premier historical artist in America today, has focused on the Civil War for over twenty years. Immersed in a life-long research of the subject, he works closely with historians and scholars to ensure the historical accuracy of each painting. Collected in this volume, for the first time in his career, are more than 175 of Mort Künstler's major paintings chronicling the Civil War, in addition to numerous portraits, sketches, and studies. The text includes commentary by Rod Gragg, Mort Künstler, James M. McPherson, and James I. Robertson, Jr.

Many of his most dramatic paintings depict critical battles--there are more than thirty-five paintings on the Battle of Gettysburg alone--but Künstler also humanizes the defining conflict of the United States. The portrayal of encamped leaders as they plot strategy, the struggles of daily life for soldiers far from home, and the romance of antebellum life, all contribute texture and detail to our understanding of Civil War.


Author Notes

James M. McPherson is the author of Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era, which won a Pulitzer Prize in history, and For Cause and Comrades: Why Men Fought in the Civil War, a Lincoln Prize winner. He is the George Henry Davis Professor of American History at Princeton University in New Jersey, where he also lives.

His newest book, entitled Abraham Lincoln, celebrates the 200th anniversary of Lincoln's birth with a short, but detailed look at this president's life. (Bowker Author Biography) James M. McPherson, McPherson was born in 1936 and received a Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University in 1963. He began teaching at Princeton University in the mid 1960's and is the author of several articles, reviews and essays on the Civil War, specifically focusing on the role of slaves in their own liberation and the activities of the abolitionists.

His earliest work, "The Struggle for Equality," studied the activities of the Abolitionist movement following the Emancipation Proclamation. "Battle Cry of Freedom" won the Pulitzer Prize for History in 1989. "Drawn With the Sword" (1996) is a collection of essays, with one entitled "The War that Never Goes Away," that is introduced by a passage from Abraham Lincoln's second inaugural address on March 4, 1865 from which its title came: "Fondly do we hope - and fervently do we pray - that this mighty scourge of war may speedily pass away. Yet, if God wills that it continue, until all the wealth piled by the bond-man's two hundred and fifty years of unrequited toil shall be sunk, and until every drop of blood drawn with the lash, shall be paid by another drawn with the sword, as was said three thousand years ago, so still it must be said, 'the judgments of the Lord, are true and righteous altogether.'"

"From Limited to Total War: 1861-1865" shows the depth of the political and social transformation brought about during the Civil War. It told how the human cost of the Civil War exceeded that of any country during World War I and explains the background to Lincoln's announcement of the Emancipation Proclamation, in 1862. The book also recounts the exploits of the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, one of the first black regiments organized in the Civil War, and their attack on Fort Wagner in July 1863. It pays tribute to Robert Gould Shaw, the white commanding officer of the regiment, who died in the attack and was buried in a mass grave with many of his men.

Professor McPherson's writings are not just about the middle decades of the nineteenth century but are also about the last decades of the twentieth century. The political turmoil prior to the Civil War, the violence of the war, Lincoln's legacy and the impeachment of Andrew Johnson shed some light on contemporary events.

(Bowker Author Biography)