Cover image for Snow
Title:
Snow
Author:
Shulevitz, Uri, 1935-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Pine Plains, N.Y. : Live Oak Media, [2000]

â„—2000
Physical Description:
1 audio disc (approximately 11 min.) : digital + 1 book (1 volumes (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 24 x 26 cm)
Summary:
As snowflakes slowly come down, one by one, people in the city ignore them, and only a boy and his dog think that the snowfall will amount to anything.
General Note:
Track 1: 5:52 (Narration with page turn signals) ; Track 2: 5:38 (Narration with no page turn signals).
Language:
English
Reading Level:
220 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 1.6 0.5 28079.

Reading Counts RC K-2 1.5 1 Quiz: 17282.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780374370923

9781591123538
Format :
Audiobook on CD

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Summary

Summary

Snow is a 1998 New York Times Outstanding Book of the Year and a 1999 Caldecott Honor Book.

"It's snowing, said boy with dog.
"It's only a snowflake," said grandfather with beard.

No one thinks one or two snowflakes will amount to anything. Not the man with the hat or the lady with the umbrella. Not even the television or the radio forecasters. But one boy and his dog have faith that the snow will amount to something spectacular, and when flakes start to swirl down on the city, they are also the only ones who know how to truly enjoy it.

Uri Shulevitz' playful depiction of a snowy day and the transformation of a city is perfectly captured in simple, poetic text and lively watercolor and pen-and-ink illustrations.


Author Notes

Uri Shulevitz is a Caldecott Medal-winning illustrator and author. He was born in Warsaw, Poland, on February 27, 1935. He began drawing at the age of three and, unlike many children, never stopped. The Warsaw blitz occurred when he was four years old, and the Shulevitz family fled. For eight years they were wanderers, arriving, eventually, in Paris in 1947. There Shulevitz developed an enthusiasm for French comic books, and soon he and a friend started making their own. At thirteen, Shulevitz won firstprize in an all-elementary-school drawing competition in Paris''s 20th district. In 1949, the family moved to Israel, where Shulevitz worked a variety of jobs: an apprentice at a rubber-stamp shop, a carpenter, and a dog-license clerk at Tel Aviv City Hall. He studied at the Teachers'' Institute in Tel Aviv, where he took courses in literature, anatomy, and biology, and also studied at the Art Institute of Tel Aviv. At fifteen, he was the youngest to exhibit in a group drawing show at the Tel AvivMuseum. At 24 he moved to New York City, where he studied painting at Brooklyn Museum Art School and drew illustrations for a publisher of Hebrew books. One day while talking on the telephone, he noticed that his doodles had a fresh and spontaneous look - different from his previous illustrations. This discovery was the beginning of Uri''s new approach to his illustrations for The Moon in My Room , his first book, published in 1963. Since then he was written and illustrated many celebrated children''s books. He won the Caldecott Medal for The Fool of the World and the Flying Ship , written by Arthur Ransome. He has also earned three Caldecott Honors, for The Treasure , Snow and How I Learned Geography . His other books include One Monday Morning , Dawn , So Sleepy Story , and many others. He also wrote the instructional guide Writing with Pictures: How to Write and Illustrate Children''s Books . He lives in New York City. Uri Shulevitz is a Caldecott Medal-winning illustrator and author. He was born in Warsaw, Poland, on February 27, 1935. He began drawing at the age of three and, unlike many children, never stopped. The Warsaw blitz occurred when he was four years old, and the Shulevitz family fled. For eight years they were wanderers, arriving, eventually, in Paris in 1947. There Shulevitz developed an enthusiasm for French comic books, and soon he and a friend started making their own. At thirteen, Shulevitz won firstprize in an all-elementary-school drawing competition in Paris''s 20th district. In 1949, the family moved to Israel, where Shulevitz worked a variety of jobs: an apprentice at a rubber-stamp shop, a carpenter, and a dog-license clerk at Tel Aviv City Hall. He studied at the Teachers'' Institute in Tel Aviv, where he took courses in literature, anatomy, and biology, and also studied at the Art Institute of Tel Aviv. At fifteen, he was the youngest to exhibit in a group drawing show at the Tel AvivMuseum. At 24 he moved to New York City, where he studied painting at Brooklyn Museum Art School and drew illustrations for a publisher of Hebrew books. One day while talking on the telephone, he noticed that his doodles had a fresh and spontaneous look - different from his previous illustrations. This discovery was the beginning of Uri''s new approach to his illustrations for The Moon in My Room , his first book, published in 1963. Since then he was written and illustrated many celebrated children''s books. He won the Caldecott Medal for The Fool of the World and the Flying Ship , written by Arthur Ransome. He has also earned three Caldecott Honors, for The Treasure , Snow and How I Learned Geography . His other books include One Monday Morning , Dawn , So Sleepy Story , and many others. He also wrote the instructional guide Writing with Pictures: How to Write and Illustrate Children''s Books . He lives in New York City.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 2^-4. As he did in Dawn (1974) and the Caldecott Honor Book The Treasure (1978), Shulevitz captures the small child's joyful vision, which can see a world in Blake's grain of sand--or in a snowflake. The innocent, small boy with his dog, uncluttered by adult experience, can see clearly what is happening around him. He counts each snowflake, one by one, until the world is white and the snow is everywhere. In contrast, the suave, sophisticated adults--the bookish authority, the cosmopolitan, the guy with a boombox, the brash announcer on TV--they are dismissive, they are certain: "No snow." But they are wrong. The setting of the clear, lovely, detailed line-and-watercolor paintings is a combination of shtetl folk art and urban contemporary, until finally the gray sky and buildings and city are totally new and white. Then the boy is free to imagine the characters of Mother Goose dancing with him and his dog in the white world of snow. Like the pictures, the rhythm of the simple, poetic words evoke the child's physical immediacy and sense of wonder as he watches snow "floating, floating through the air, falling, falling everywhere." Kids will enjoy the small child's triumph in the fact that he is right, even as they will recognize the exhilaration of a snowfall that changes what you thought you knew. --Hazel Rochman


Publisher's Weekly Review

In this companion to Dawn and Rain Rain Rivers, Shulevitz uses text as spare as a December landscape to cast a spell of winter magic. Despite predictions to the contrary ("`No snow,' said radio"; "`It'll melt,' said woman with umbrella"), a boy and his dog spy a single snowflake and rush outside in gleeful anticipation. Sure enough, one snowflake turns into two, two into three, and before long snow is "dancing, playing,/ there, and there,/ floating, floating through the air." In a lovely fantasy sequence that hints at the wonder children find in snowfall, a trio of Mother Goose characters climb down from a bookshop window to join the boy and his dog as they frolic through the city streets. The Caldecott Medalist works a bit of visual alchemy as the tale progresses, gradually transforming the chilly gray watercolor washes with flecks of snow, until his cityscape is a frozen fairyland. Pure enchantment from start to finish. Ages 3-up. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-When a young boy sees a single snowflake fall, he rejoices that a major storm is on the way, despite predictions to the contrary. But it is the child who prevails as the "snowflakes keep coming and coming and coming." Shulevitz's outstanding illustrations, rendered in watercolor and pen and ink, enrich and extend the brief text. The boy and his dog appear in the lower right-hand corner of the appropriately white front endpapers, arms and legs joyfully pummeling the air, and readers can almost forecast his announcement, "It's snowing." Pictures are framed in varying amounts of white space, the largest frames engulfing the nay-saying adults. The illustrations gradually build to a two-page spread in which "the whole city is white." Shulevitz's cartoons are filled with humorous touches: buildings tilt; an oversized woman carries a tiny umbrella; a tall man wears an outrageously tall hat; a radio almost as big as the person carrying it appears to have eyes, nose, and mouth. The characters displayed in the window of "Mother Goose Books" come to life to cavort with the child among the swirling flakes. Youngsters will joyfully join the boy in his winter-welcoming dance.-Marianne Saccardi, Norwalk Community-Technical College, CT (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.