Cover image for The grim grotto
Title:
The grim grotto
Author:
Snicket, Lemony.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Harper Children's Audio, [2004]

℗2004
Physical Description:
6 audio discs (6 hr.) : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
Summary:
The Baudelaire siblings descend into the depths of despair, underwater. The horrors they encounter are too numerous to list, and include mushrooms, a mechanical monster, a distressing message from a lost friend, and tap dancing.
General Note:
Enhanced CDs.

Compact discs.

Unabridged.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
1120 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 6.5 8.0 81705.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780060579470
Format :
Audiobook on CD

Available:*

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Summary

Summary

Dear Listener,

Unless you are a slug, a sea anemone, or mildew, you probably prefer not to be damp. You might also prefer not to listen to this audiobook, in which the Baudelaire siblings descend into the depths of despair, underwater. The horrors they encounter are too numerous to list, and include mushrooms, a mechanical monster, a distressing message from a lost friend, and tap dancing.

I also shouldn't mention the features of the interactive CD, which include:

l Perplexing word games l Photos from The Lemony Snicket Archives l
l Art from The Brett Helquist gallery l

As a dedicated author who has pledged to keep recording the depressing story of the Baudelaires, I must continue to delve deep into the cavernous depths of the orphans' lives. You, on the other hand, may delve into some happier audiobook in order to keep your ears and your spirits from being dampened.

With all due respect,

Lemony Snicket


Author Notes

Lemony Snicket is the pen name of Daniel Handler, who was born on February 28, 1970. As Lemony Snicket, he is the author of and appears as a character in the children's book series A Series of Unfortunate Events. He has also written or contributed to other works using this pen name including Baby in the Manger, The Lump of Coal, The Composer Is Dead, and Where Did You See Her Last?.

Under his real name, Handler is the author of several books for adults including The Basic Eight, Watch Your Mouth, and Adverbs.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 4-6. With the movie poised for release and a wealth of promotional materials (including editions of the books with disappointing photos on the covers) already available, it wouldn't do to ignore the latest book in A Series of Unfortunate Events. Snicket reconnects with the Baudelaire orphans precisely where he left them, tobogganing down the Stricken Stream, and then sends them down under the waves in a submarine escapade, during which, of course, they encounter the evil Orlof and his cronies. Snicket, who hasn't lost his touch for peculiar, imaginative setups, injects plenty of wry asides and witty vocabulary enrichment. His villains remain deliciously villainous, and the long-suffering Baudelaires still accept struggle without complaint. This time, though, Snicket adds a few characters who don't quite fit the molds, and this is the first book to hint that the unfortunate events that have dogged the kids through 10 previous adventures may be coming to an end. Book the Twelfth will surely provide more clues. --Stephanie Zvirin Copyright 2004 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Highly anticipated sequels hit the shelves this month. In the new installment in Lemony Snicket's bestselling series, A Series of Unfortunate Events #11: The Grim Grotto, illus. by Brett Helquist, the Baudelaire siblings find themselves aboard the submarine Queequeg, under the command of Captain Widdershins. Their search for the inexplicably important "sugar bowl" leads them to the Gorgonian Grotto, an undersea cave filled with malevolent mushrooms, only to face capture by Count Olaf. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-7-This episode of Lemony Snicket's continuing saga of the Baudelaire orphans (HarperCollins, 2004), finds them on a sled in the Stricken Stream. They are spotted by blustery Captain Widdershins of the submarine Queequeg and taken aboard. Violet, Claus, and Sunny, dressed in diving suits with Herman Melville's picture on the front, meet the captain's bookish step-daughter, Fiona and the overly-optimistic cook, Phil (from the Lucky Smells Lumberyard). The crew sets out to find a lucky sugar bowl. They arrive at the fearsome Gorgonian Grotto, Sunny is attacked by a poisonous mushroom, leaving her gasping for breath. And, to make matters worse, the crew runs into the clutches of the villainous Count Olaf, the slick and chic Esme Squalor, and the bratty Carmelita Spats. Will the Baudelaires find an antidote to save Sunny? Will they escape from Count Olaf, Esme Squalor, and Carmelita Spats' horrid singing? Will they find the sugar bowl? Narrator Tim Curry takes on the persona of each character, bringing them to life with his unique narration. The Grim Grotto is a necessary addition to all library collections so Lemony Snicket fans can hear more about the continuing tribulations of the Baudelaires.-Larry Cooperman, Jacksonville Public Library, FL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

A Series of Unfortunate Events #11: The Grim Grotto Chapter One After a great deal of time examining oceans, investigating rainstorms, and staring very hard at several drinking fountains, the scientists of the world developed a theory regarding how water is distributed around our planet, which they have named "the water cycle." The water cycle consists of three key phenomena -- evaporation, precipitation, and collection -- and all of them are equally boring. Of course, it is boring to read about boring things, but it is better to read something that makes you yawn with boredom than something that will make you weep uncontrollably, pound your fists against the floor, and leave tearstains all over your pillowcase, sheets, and boomerang collection. Like the water cycle, the tale of the Baudelaire children consists of three key phenomena, but rather than read their sorry tale it would be best if you read something about the water cycle instead. Violet, the eldest phenomenon, was nearly fifteen years old and very nearly the best inventor the world had ever seen. As far as I can tell she was certainly the best inventor who had ever found herself trapped in the gray waters of the Stricken Stream, clinging desperately to a toboggan as she was carried away from the Valley of Four Drafts, and if I were you I would prefer to focus on the boring phenomenon of evaporation, which refers to the process of water turning into vapor and eventually forming clouds, rather than think about the turmoil that awaited her at the bottom of the Mortmain Mountains. Klaus was the second eldest of the Baudelaire siblings, but it would be better for your health if you concentrated on the boring phenomenon of precipitation, which refers to vapor turning back into water and falling as rain, rather than spending even one moment thinking about the phenomenon of Klaus's excellent skills as a researcher, and the amount of trouble and woe these skills would bring him once he and his siblings met up with Count Olaf, the notorious villain who had been after the children ever since their parents had perished in a terrible fire. And even Sunny Baudelaire, who had recently passed out of babyhood, is a phenomenon all to herself, not only for her very sharp teeth, which had helped the Baudelaires in a number of unpleasant circumstances, but also for her newfound skills as a cook, which had fed the Baudelaires in a number of unpleasant circumstances. Although the phenomenon of collection, which describes the gathering of fallen rain into one place so it can evaporate once more and begin the entire tedious process all over again, is probably the most boring phenomenon in the water cycle, it would be far better for you to get up and go right to your nearest library and spend several boring days reading every single boring fact you can find about collection, because the phenomenon of what happens to Sunny Baudelaire over the course of these pages is the most dreadful phenomenon I can think of, and I can think of a great many. The water cycle may be a series of boring phenomena, but the story of the Baudelaires is something else entirely, and this is an excellent opportunity to read something boring instead of learning what became of the Baudelaires as the rushing waters of the Stricken Stream carried them away from the mountains. "What will become of us?" Violet asked, raising her voice to be heard over the rushing water. "I don't think I can invent anything that can stop this toboggan." "I don't think you should try," Klaus called back to his sister. "The arrival of False Spring has thawed out the stream, but the waters are still very cold. If one of us fell into the stream, I'm not sure how long we could survive." "Quigley," Sunny whimpered. The youngest Baudelaire often talked in a way that could be difficult to understand, but lately her speech had been developing almost as quickly as her cooking skills, and her siblings knew that Sunny was referring to Quigley Quagmire, with whom the Baudelaires had recently become friends. Quigley had helped Violet and Klaus reach the top of Mount Fraught in order to find the V.F.D. headquarters and rescue Sunny from Count Olaf's clutches, but another tributary of the Stricken Stream had carried him off in the opposite direction, and the cartographer -- a word which here means "someone who is very good with maps, and of whom Violet Baudelaire was particularly fond" -- didn't even have a toboggan to keep him out of the chilly water. "I'm sure Quigley has gotten out of the water," Violet said quickly, although of course she was sure of no such thing. "I only wish we knew where he was going. He told us to meet him somewhere, but the waterfall interrupted him." The toboggan bobbed in the water as Klaus reached into his pocket and drew out a dark blue notebook. The notebook had been a gift from Quigley, and Klaus was using it as a commonplace book, a phrase which here means "notebook in which he wrote any interesting or useful information." "We decoded that message telling us about an important V.F.D. gathering on Thursday," he said, "and thanks to Sunny, we know that the meeting is at the Hotel Denoue ment. Maybe that's where Quigley wants to meet us -- at the last safe place." "But we don't know where it is," Violet pointed out. "How can we meet someone in an unknown location?" The three Baudelaires sighed, and for a few moments the siblings sat quietly on the toboggan and listened to the gurgling of the stream. There are some people who like to watch a stream for hours, staring at the glittering water and thinking about the mysteries of the world. But the waters of the Stricken Stream were too dirty to glitter, and every mystery the children tried to solve seemed to reveal even more mysteries, and even those mysteries contained mysteries, so when they pondered these mysteries they felt more overwhelmed than thoughtful. They knew that V.F.D. was a secret organization, but they couldn't seem to find out much about what the organization did, or why it should concern the Baudelaires. They knew that Count Olaf was very eager to get his filthy hands on a certain sugar bowl, but they had no idea why the sugar bowl was so important, or where in the world it was. They knew that there were people in the world who could help them, but so many of these people -- guardians, friends, bankers -- had proven to be of no help at all, or had vanished from their lives just when the Baudelaires needed them most. And they knew there were people in the world who would not help them -- villainous people, and their number seemed to be growing as their treachery and wickedness trickled all over the earth, like a dreadful water cycle of woe and despair. But right now the biggest mystery seemed to be what to do next, and as the Baudelaires huddled together on the floating toboggan they could not think of a thing. A Series of Unfortunate Events #11: The Grim Grotto . Copyright © by Lemony Snicket. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold. Excerpted from The Grim Grotto by Lemony Snicket All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.