Cover image for The hanging in the hotel : a Fethering mystery
Title:
The hanging in the hotel : a Fethering mystery
Author:
Brett, Simon.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Berkley Prime Crime, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
345 pages ; 22 cm
Language:
English
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9780425196519
Format :
Book

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FICTION Adult Fiction Mystery/Suspense
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FICTION Adult Fiction Popular Materials-Mystery
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Summary

Summary

A group of local businessmen, the Pillars of Sussex, has descended upon the Hopwicke Country House Hotel, where Jude is waitressing as a favor to her friend. But when a man interested in joining the Pillars is found dead, Jude suspects foul play, and drafts Carole into conducting their own investigation, one that's sure to topple a few Pillars...


Author Notes

Simon Brett was born in Worcester Park, Surrey on October 28, 1945. He attended Dulwich College and then Wadham College, Oxford, where he studied English. Between 1967 and 1977, he was a producer with BBC Radio. He also spent a couple of years working for Thames Television.

In 1975, he published his first 'Charles Paris' novel. By 1979, Brett had become a full-time writer. He has written and edited children's books, humorous novels and several anthologies. In 1986, he introduced another sleuth: Mrs Pargeter.

As well as the Charles Paris and Mrs. Pargeter detective series, he is also the author of the radio and television series After Henry, the radio series No Commitments and the bestselling How to be a Little Sod . His novel A Shock to the System was filmed starring Michael Caine.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

An Edwardian country house converted into a sumptuous hotel, complete with sweeping views of the South Downs and the English Channel, provides the setting for two murders in Brett's fifth Fethering mystery. This may sound like another fraying-around-the-edges formulaic cozy, but not in the hands of Brett, who once constructed backstage, behind-the-mike British theater mysteries starring an alcoholic, fading actor-sleuth. Brett infuses his plots with scathing and hilarious social commentary; reading him is very much like deciphering Hogarth's pictorial send-ups of low and high society. Brett's latest sleuths are middle-aged women in the seaside village of Fethering-- Carole Seddon, an early-retired, acerbic refugee from the Home Office, and her neighbor, Jude, a blowsy, New Agey freethinker. They have stumbled upon (and over) bodies on the beach, on the Downs, and on the grounds of a museum. Jude has the honors of finding a body this time as she helps out at the local hotel--the body of a young man strangled by a cord on a four-poster bed. Even odder than the man's death is the fact that seemingly everyone wants to dismiss this and a subsequent death at the hotel as accidental or suicide, especially the members of the all-male, all-powerful Pillars of Sussex, to which one victim belonged and the other aspired. Intricate plotting and wry comedy make this the best Fethering yet. --Connie Fletcher Copyright 2004 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Prolific British author Brett's fifth Fethering mystery (after 2003's Murder in the Museum) featuring Carole Seddon offers comfortable pacing and plenty of plot twists. Carole's pal Jude Nichols bails out an old friend by waiting tables at the Hopwicke Country House Hotel, once the playground of the very rich and very famous. Hopwicke and its owner, former model Suzy Longthorne, have fallen on hard times since 9/11, and the hotel has been forced to accept a far less sophisticated clientele, like the Pillars of Sussex men's club. The Pillars have a long and spotty history of philanthropy, but are far better known as a group of carousing gentlemen with friends in high places. When a possible inductee is found hanged in his room, only Jude believes it wasn't a suicide. The Pillars all tell the same story, the police are convinced with little investigation and even Suzy, who found a threatening note before the inductee's death, suddenly clams up. Jude turns to Carole, and the two try to untangle a tightening web of lies. The entertaining supporting cast includes a chef with attitude and a slew of solicitors, one of whom is maddeningly smitten with Carole. Agent, Jane Chelius. (Aug. 3) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved