Cover image for Kaiserschlacht 1918 : the final German offensive of World War One
Title:
Kaiserschlacht 1918 : the final German offensive of World War One
Author:
Gray, Randal.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
96 pages : illustrations (some color), color maps ; 26 cm.
General Note:
Originally published: Oxford : Osprey, 1991.

Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780275982898
Format :
Book

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D545.S75 G73 2004 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

The entry of the United States into World War One spelled disaster for Imperial Germany. The massive superiority in men and materials that the Americans could provide meant that if Germany had any chance of winning the war she must do so quickly. Randal Gray describes how, using special Storm Trooper units and high-mobility tactics, the Germans came within a hair's breadth of winning the war, providing a blow-by-blow account of the daily events of the battle. Although at first glance the Kaiserschlacht was Germany's greatest success of the First World War, in fact its ultimate failure consigned Germany to inevitable defeat.

The entry of the United States into World War One spelled disaster for Imperial Germany. The massive superiority in men and materials that the Americans could provide meant that if Germany had any chance of winning the war she must do so quickly. Randal Gray describes how, using special Storm Trooper units and high-mobility tactics, the Germans shattered the frontline, broke into open country and came within a hair's breadth of winning the war. Gray shows how the armies of 1918 had more in common with those of the 1939-42 Blitzkrieg era than to their immediate 1914 forebears. Finally, the outcome of the battle is investigated: although the British suffered 177,739 casualties, they could replace their losses in both men and material far more easily than the Germans could. Although the Kaiserschlacht was Germany's greatest tactical success of the First World War, it could not prevent her inevitable defeat.