Cover image for The lost choice
Title:
The lost choice
Author:
Andrews, Andy, 1959-
Personal Author:
Edition:
Unabridged.
Publication Information:
Carol Stream, IL : Oasis Audio, [2004]

â„—2004
Physical Description:
6 audio discs (approximately 6 hrs.) : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
General Note:
"A legend of personal discovery"--Container.

Compact discs.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781589266896
Format :
Audiobook on CD

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BJ1597 .A52 2004D Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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Summary

Summary

Dorry Chandler is a journalist who has always had a taste for mysteries. Curious about the strange "rock" her son has found, she takes it to Dylan Langford, an expert on antiquities who works at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. When the language inscribed on the artifact is translated, a far-reaching mystery begins to unravel. This normal family's life becomes anything but normal as each piece of evidence sheds additional light on the object's significance. The Chandlers may have unearthed a fragment of one of the most profound relics in mankind's history and the key to understanding the extraordinary achievements of esteemed men and women throughout time--Joan of Arc, Thomas Jefferson, George Washington Carver, Oskar Schindler--who seem to have been profoundly
affected by the message the object bears. What power resides in this seemingly unimportant piece of bronze? Who passed its secrets on through the centuries? And why has the object appeared now, in this way, in this time and place? Weaving a thread of good and evil through history, The Lost Choice follows the story of an ancient relic and offers a parable of the hidden potential of the human heart.


Author Notes

Andy Andrews is an internationally known speaker and novelist whose combined works have sold millions of copies worldwide. He has been received at the White House and has spoken at the request of four different United States presidents. Andrews' bestselling book, The Traveler's Gift: Seven Decisions that Determine Personal Success, is an international bestseller that remained on the New York Times bestseller list for four and a half months; it has been translated into nearly 20 languages.

Andrews lived a relatively normal life until the age of nineteen, when both his parents died, his mother from cancer, his father in an automobile accident. Andrews says he made some bad choices at this point in his life found himself homeless, sleeping occasionally under a pier on the gulf coast or in someone's garage. He begain to ask himself, "Is life just a lottery ticket, or are there choices one can make to direct his future?" Over time, he read more than two hundred biographies of great men and women. How did they become the people they were, he wondered. Were they simply born this way? Or were there decisions made at critical junctures in their lives that led to such success? Andrews finally determined that there were seven characteristics that each person had in common. This became the basis for his story in The Traveler's Gift.

Andrews also wrote The Butterfly Effect, The Heart Mender, The Noticer, and The Noticer Returns.

(Publisher Provided)


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

Bestselling author Andrews (The Traveler's Gift) takes a cue from the success of his previous book, built around time travel, motivational ideas and historical figures, and continues in the same vein. When Mark and Dorry Chandler find an odd bronze object in a ditch in their Denver backyard, they begin to investigate its origin. Andrews develops the theme of the importance of making good choices, using the motif of four inscribed ancient bronze objects that together form a cup. Each fragment symbolizes choices that its historic owner made, influenced by the object. Using flashbacks, Andrews offers numerous short vignettes of the different historical figures who possessed each of the fragments, including Oskar Schindler, Alfred Vanderbilt, John Adams and George Washington Carver among others. The flashbacks are simply presented, and they often have the feel of fictional minibiographies for young readers rather than meaty adult fare. There's nothing particularly compelling about the storytelling-the mechanics of fiction are creaky in places-but that's not the point. Rather, the book stands on the positive message that one person by his or her decisions can change the world. As he did in The Traveler's Gift, Andrews should appeal to those readers looking for an uncomplicated motivational read with a dollop of history thrown in for good measure. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved