Cover image for Huck Finn & Tom Sawyer among the Indians
Title:
Huck Finn & Tom Sawyer among the Indians
Author:
Twain, Mark, 1835-1910.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Springville, Utah : Council Press, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
vii, 277 pages ; 22 cm
General Note:
Unfinished novel by Mark Twain, completed by Lee Nelson.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781555176808
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Y FICTION Young Adult Fiction Young Adult
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Y FICTION Young Adult Fiction Young Adult
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Summary

Summary

Sequel to The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. begun by Mark Twain in 1885, finished by Lee Nelson


Author Notes

Mark Twain was born Samuel L. Clemens in Florida, Missouri on November 30, 1835. He worked as a printer, and then became a steamboat pilot. He traveled throughout the West, writing humorous sketches for newspapers. In 1865, he wrote the short story, The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County, which was very well received. He then began a career as a humorous travel writer and lecturer, publishing The Innocents Abroad in 1869, Roughing It in 1872, and, Gilded Age in 1873, which was co-authored with Charles Dudley Warner. His best-known works are The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Mississippi Writing: Life on the Mississippi, and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. He died of a heart attack on April 21, 1910.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up-Though Twain began this story in 1885, it was never finished. As it opens, Tom convinces Huck and freed-slave Jim to head West to live with the "Injuns," just to prove that the red men are not the ornery savages the Widow Douglas has insisted they are. They soon join up with the Oregon-bound Mills family. A group of Sioux warriors befriend them but then slaughters the Mills boys and their parents, carrying off the two daughters, Peggy and Flaxy, and Jim. Huck and Tom join forces with Peggy's fianc?, Brace, to rescue the captives and approach the Indian camp-and here ends Twain's part of the story. Nelson continues with Brace being killed and Tom and Huck left to continue the rescue. As was Twain's wont, Nelson does not shy away from touchy subjects-Peggy is raped by both the Indians and a white trader; an army sergeant molests unsuspecting adolescent boys, and relations between the Mormons and the U.S. are badly strained. There are scalpings, shootings, and a near hanging but by the end, Huck seems to be turning himself into "a right civilized" type, marrying Peggy and heading off into the sunset to start a new life. Nelson makes an effort to retain Twain's style of writing and does rather well with it. The adventure and harrowing escapes will keep readers interested, although purists may question whether Twain would have allowed Huck to give up his independence to marry Peggy. Nonetheless, the plot is intriguing, suspenseful, and well told, with plenty of realistic details to set the mood. Though Tom and Jim figure prominently in the beginning of this story, Huck is the clear hero, and his basic goodness never comes into question.-Nancy Menaldi-Scanlan, LaSalle Academy, Providence, RI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.