Cover image for A right worthy grand mission : Maggie Lena Walker and the quest for Black economic empowerment
Title:
A right worthy grand mission : Maggie Lena Walker and the quest for Black economic empowerment
Author:
Marlowe, Gertrude Woodruff, 1930-1996.
Publication Information:
Washington, DC : Howard University Press, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
xlviii, 286 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, portraits ; 23 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780882582115

9780882582108
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

A thoroughly documented study of pioneering African-American insurance magnate, banking executive, and civic icon Maggie Walker, whose tumultuous life and times were filled with multiple layers of intrigue.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

Maggie Lena Walker was an icon to the African American community in Richmond and Virginia in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Walker's strong leadership and organizational abilities, an engaging speaking style, and commitment to community values allowed her to direct the remarkable growth of the fraternal society the Independent Order of St. Luke and to advocate business prospects for African Americans. Under her leadership, St. Luke's grew to over 100,000 members. She used St. Luke's resources to create employment opportunities for African Americans, especially women, by organizing a bank, an insurance program, a newspaper, a printing business, and a department store. Her successful economic endeavors and extensive travels on fraternal business brought her into the circle of national African American elites. Making good use of few available sources, late anthropologist Marlowe (formerly, Howard Univ.) has presented a detailed and engaging biography of Walker and her family, revealing an influential businesswoman who was deeply committed to improving her community through economic development. The book's sections on Walker's leadership of St. Luke's effectively addresses not only her drive to be successful but also the limitations of her efforts. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. All libraries. R. M. Hyser James Madison University


Choice Review

Maggie Lena Walker was an icon to the African American community in Richmond and Virginia in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Walker's strong leadership and organizational abilities, an engaging speaking style, and commitment to community values allowed her to direct the remarkable growth of the fraternal society the Independent Order of St. Luke and to advocate business prospects for African Americans. Under her leadership, St. Luke's grew to over 100,000 members. She used St. Luke's resources to create employment opportunities for African Americans, especially women, by organizing a bank, an insurance program, a newspaper, a printing business, and a department store. Her successful economic endeavors and extensive travels on fraternal business brought her into the circle of national African American elites. Making good use of few available sources, late anthropologist Marlowe (formerly, Howard Univ.) has presented a detailed and engaging biography of Walker and her family, revealing an influential businesswoman who was deeply committed to improving her community through economic development. The book's sections on Walker's leadership of St. Luke's effectively addresses not only her drive to be successful but also the limitations of her efforts. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. All libraries. R. M. Hyser James Madison University


Table of Contents

Forewordp. ix
Prefacep. xiii
Acknowledgmentsp. xix
Introductionp. xxiii
1 Early Yearsp. 1
2 Stepping Up To Leadershipp. 27
3 Voicing A New Visionp. 54
4 Theory Into Actionp. 79
5 Preserving Gainsp. 108
6 Politics Of Prominencep. 137
7 Reignited Activismp. 167
8 A Stately Descentp. 200
9 Lasting Legacyp. 236
Appendix A Independent Order of St. Luke Membership Figuresp. 262
Appendix B The Will Controversyp. 268
Indexp. 272
Forewordp. ix
Prefacep. xiii
Acknowledgmentsp. xix
Introductionp. xxiii
1 Early Yearsp. 1
2 Stepping Up To Leadershipp. 27
3 Voicing A New Visionp. 54
4 Theory Into Actionp. 79
5 Preserving Gainsp. 108
6 Politics Of Prominencep. 137
7 Reignited Activismp. 167
8 A Stately Descentp. 200
9 Lasting Legacyp. 236
Appendix A Independent Order of St. Luke Membership Figuresp. 262
Appendix B The Will Controversyp. 268
Indexp. 272