Cover image for Pearl and Wagner : three secrets
Title:
Pearl and Wagner : three secrets
Author:
McMullan, Kate.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Dial Books for Young Readers, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
48 pages : color illustrations ; 24 cm.
Summary:
Pearl and Wagner, a rabbit and a mouse who are best friends, learn about secrets during a trip to an ice cream factory and an amusement park birthday party.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
330 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.2 0.5 78985.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.1 1 Quiz: 42048.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780803725744
Format :
Book

Available:*

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J READER Juvenile Fiction Readers
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J READER Juvenile Fiction Readers
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Pearl and Wagner are back, and they are full of secrets: Wagner tells Pearl an embarrassing secret, Pearl tells Wagner a surprising secret, and Lulu tells Wagner a secret that turns out not to be a secret at all. On a school field trip and at a birthday party, Pearl and Wagner learn that some secrets can bring friends closer together, while others can cause all sorts of trouble. In the end, no secret will ever come between Pearl and Wagner!

Beginning readers will laugh and recognize a little of themselves on every page of this charming, warm, and funny book about friendship.


Author Notes

Kate McMullan was born in 1947 in St. Louis, Missouri. She received a Bachelor's degree in elementary education at the University of Tulsa and a Master's degree in early childhood education from Ohio State University. She taught elementary school in inner-city Los Angeles and on an American Air Force base in Germany. In 1976, she moved to New York City and became an editor of language arts and audiovisual materials for a publishing house.

She has written over 50 children's books under the names Kate McMullan, Katy Hall, and K. H. McMullan. The book, I Stink!, won a Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor. Nutcracker Noel and Hey, Pipsqueak, which were illustrated by her husband Jim McMullan, were voted among the New York Times Ten Best Picture Books of the Year. She writes the Dragon Slayers' Academy series and the Fluffy, the Classroom Guinea Pig series.

She also teaches at New York University's School of Continuing and Professional Studies and is a member of the faculty of the New School's MFA Writing Program.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

K-Gr. 2. Rabbit and mouse buddies from Pearl and Wagner: Two Good Friends (2003) return in this short chapter book. In the first section, Wagner struggles to keep a secret about Lulu's party, only to discover that Pearl knew all along. In the next, Wagner dreads the party. He confides to Pearl that he's afraid of roller coasters, but she bolsters his confidence. Then, at the amusement park, Pearl reveals her own trepidation to Wagner, who helps her enjoy the roller coaster ride. Many children will recognize their own struggles and fears in this episodic story, told with simple words and plenty of realistic dialogue. Alley captures the animal characters' all-too-human foibles and feelings in his skillful, spirited ink drawings, brightened with watercolors and colored pencils. --Carolyn Phelan Copyright 2004 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-The appealing rabbit-and-mouse duo are back. When Wagner tries very hard to keep a classmate's confidence from Pearl, they both learn that secrets can strain a relationship. However, in the next two chapters, the friends discover that by sharing their private concerns they can solidify the bond between them; when Wagner reveals his fear of roller coasters to Pearl, she later admits that she is also terrified of them. McMullan uses short sentences and simple dialogue while successfully bringing forth a plot with complex emotions that youngsters can relate to. Done in pen and ink, watercolor, and colored pencils, the vibrant illustrations complement the text-the animal characters have unique personalities that are clearly conveyed through their expressions. A humorous story that addresses common concerns for children who are progressing through the stages of early reading.-Anne Knickerbocker, formerly at Cedar Brook Elementary School, Houston, TX (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.