Cover image for A sourcebook for genealogical research : resources alphabetically by type and location
Title:
A sourcebook for genealogical research : resources alphabetically by type and location
Author:
Stockwell, Foster.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
x, 326 pages ; 26 cm
Language:
English
Genre:
ISBN:
9780786417827
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
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Material Type
Home Location
Status
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CS9 .S76 2004 Adult Non-Fiction Grosvenor Room-Reference
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CS9 .S76 2004 Adult Non-Fiction E-Branch
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Summary

Summary

Genealogists can sometimes require obscure resources when in search of information about ancestors. Tracking down records to complete a family tree can become laborious when the researcher doesn't know where to begin looking. Many of the best resources are maintained regionally or even locally, and aren't widely known. This reference work serves as a guide to both beginning and experienced genealogy researchers. The sourcebook is easily accessible and usable, featuring approximately 270 entries on all aspects of genealogical research and family history compilation. The entries are listed alphabetically and cross-referenced so any researcher can quickly find the information he or she is seeking. Each state and each of the provinces of Canada has its own entry; other countries are listed under appropriate headings. The author also provides more than 700 addresses from all over the world so that the genealogist or general researcher may contact any one of these organizations to obtain specific information about particular births, deaths, marriages, or other life events in order to complete a family tree.


Author Notes

Foster Stockwell is a publishing consultant for Chinese publishers and authors. He lives in Des Moines, Washington.


Reviews 3

Publisher's Weekly Review

Stockwell (History of Information Storage and Retrieval) here offers a collection of genealogy-related definitions and discussions, with subjects ranging from Ecuadorian genealogy to name abbreviations. For each U.S. state entry, Stockwell gives a general overview of the state's history along with information on various types of records. He then lists each county and county seat within the state. International research is also covered, again with general histories of countries and synopses of available records. While the beginning researcher may find items of interest here, some of the information is outdated. For example, Stockwell notes that the catalog of the Latter-day Saints' Family History Library is available on microfiche but fails to add that it has also been online at the FamilySearch web site since 1999. Further, the entry on genealogical periodicals mentions two smaller indexes of selected titles but ignores the mammoth Periodical Source Index. Likewise, the entry on Ohio records recommends John W. Heisey's brief Ohio Genealogical Research Guide for further study instead of Kip Sperry's comprehensive and contemporary Genealogical Research in Ohio. Bottom Line While publishers are free to charge what they want for their products, this paperback's steep price puts it out of reach for many cash-strapped libraries--and genealogists. And since it is far from inclusive, it is recommended only as a marginal purchase.--Elaine M. Kuhn, Allen Cty. P.L., Ft. Wayne, IN (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

Stockwell (History of Information Storage and Retrieval) here offers a collection of genealogy-related definitions and discussions, with subjects ranging from Ecuadorian genealogy to name abbreviations. For each U.S. state entry, Stockwell gives a general overview of the state's history along with information on various types of records. He then lists each county and county seat within the state. International research is also covered, again with general histories of countries and synopses of available records. While the beginning researcher may find items of interest here, some of the information is outdated. For example, Stockwell notes that the catalog of the Latter-day Saints' Family History Library is available on microfiche but fails to add that it has also been online at the FamilySearch web site since 1999. Further, the entry on genealogical periodicals mentions two smaller indexes of selected titles but ignores the mammoth Periodical Source Index. Likewise, the entry on Ohio records recommends John W. Heisey's brief Ohio Genealogical Research Guide for further study instead of Kip Sperry's comprehensive and contemporary Genealogical Research in Ohio. Bottom Line While publishers are free to charge what they want for their products, this paperback's steep price puts it out of reach for many cash-strapped libraries and genealogists. And since it is far from inclusive, it is recommended only as a marginal purchase. Elaine M. Kuhn, Allen Cty. P.L., Ft. Wayne, IN (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Claiming to be easy to use for both professional and amateur genealogists, this encyclopedic dictionary of genealogy has entries for each of the 50 states, the provinces of Canada, and some foreign countries, and entries for topics such as "Church Records" and "Family Bibles." Entries do not contain information most genealogists will find useful; only beginning genealogists or nongenealogists will find this source of any use and then only for very general information. Totally useless in each state entry is a list of counties. Four paragraphs about Japanese genealogy will be little help to persons actually planning to search Japanese genealogical sources. The address list at the end is not annotated, giving researchers no clue as to what help the organizations at those addresses would provide. The bibliography has some good sources but is arranged alphabetically by author, so readers must scan the entire bibliography to find sources possibly useful for the place being researched. ^BSumming Up: Not recommended. J. O. Christensen Brigham Young University