Cover image for Jewish writers of the twentieth century
Title:
Jewish writers of the twentieth century
Author:
Kerbel, Sorrel.
Publication Information:
New York : Fitzroy Dearborn, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
xviii, 695 pages ; 29 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781579583132
Format :
Book

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PN842 .J48 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Oversize Non-Circ
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Summary

Summary

Now available in paperback for the first time, Jewish Writers of the Twentieth Centuryis both a comprehensive reference resource and a springboard for further study.

This volume:

examines canonical Jewish writers, less well-known authors of Yiddish and Hebrew, and emerging Israeli writers includes entries on figures as diverse as Marcel Proust, Franz Kafka, Tristan Tzara, Eugene Ionesco, Harold Pinter, Tom Stoppard, Arthur Miller, Saul Bellow, Nadine Gordimer, and Woody Allen contains introductory essays on Jewish-American writing, Holocaust literature and memoirs, Yiddish writing, and Anglo-Jewish literature provides a chronology of twentieth-century Jewish writers.

Compiled by expert contributors, this book contains over 330 entries on individual authors, each consisting of a biography, a list of selected publications, a scholarly essay on their work and suggestions for further reading.


Author Notes

Sorrel Kerbelis an independent scholar who has taught English Literature at the University of Port Elizabeth and taught a "creative reading" circle in London that studied the work of Jewish writers.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Overviews of 314 writers of prose, fiction, poetry, and drama from all over the world are presented in this volume. A series of introductory essays covers American-Jewish Literature, British-Jewish Literature, Hebrew Literature in the Twentieth Century, Holocaust Writing, and Yiddish Writing in the Twentieth Century. The editors do not attempt to defineewish writing, and they accept anyone who identified themselves as aew, or was perceived as such by others. This gave them a wide field for selection. Beginning with Theodore Herzl, the father of Zionism, who was also a dramatist, they chose an international group of writers, among them Anita Brookner, Nadine Gordimer, Franzafka, Primo Levi, Norman Mailer, Amos Oz, Boris Pasternak, and Marcel Proust. The alphabetical entries are one to two pages long. They include a brief biography, a selected list of writings, a bibliography of selected critical works, and an essay about the writer's major works and style. The front of the book contains alphabetical and chronological lists of the writers covered. A title index of works included in the bibliographies and information about the 149 contributors appears at the end.\b Although information about many of these authors is available in general encyclopedias and sources such as Gale's Dictionary of Literary Biography series, ewish Writers of the Twentieth Century provides a focused context that explains how and whyews have taken their places among the most important writers of the last century. It is a useful source for academic libraries, especially those supportingewish studies and comparative literature programs, and for large public libraries with an interested clientele. -- RBB Copyright 2003 Booklist


Library Journal Review

This scholarly reference to Jewish literary writers of the past century highlights novelists, poets, and dramatists while excluding philosophers, religious thinkers, and historians. In this case, "Jewish" means not only those born Jewish but also those with only one Jewish parent, those who converted to other religions, and those who identified themselves as Jews. The book opens with introductory surveys on American, British, Hebrew, Holocaust, and Yiddish literature of the 20th century, written by a variety of Israeli scholars, many of whom are contributing to a reference work for the first time. These essays offer useful overviews and help frame the literature. Following is an A-Z listing of writers, which makes up the bulk of the work. Ranging from Walter Abish to Fay Zwicky and including writers working in a variety of languages, including Hebrew, German, Portuguese, French, Italian, and Russian, these entries contain a paragraph-long biography, bibliographic lists, and concise and insightful discussions that place each author's work in social, cultural, and artistic context. The critical discussions analyze literary techniques, stress the Jewish content of an author's work, and ponder the great questions of Jewish life in the 20th century, including socialism, Zionism, feminism, the Holocaust, and personal conduct. A title index, alphabetical and chronological lists of authors, and a list of contributors round out the text. Although some authors have been neglected (e.g., Paul Rosenfeld, Denise Levertov, and Mark Halpern), and some entries contain errors or misstatements (e.g., Carl Soloman was not a murderer, Naomi Ginsberg was not a victim of Stalin's purges, and Yorium Kaniuk's war injuries are sometimes described as physical and sometimes as emotional), this reference is still a good addition to Jewish studies and literature collections in academic libraries.-Gene Shaw, NYPL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Kerbel's volume is a critical and biographical guide to 343 Jewish writers born between 1836 and 1967, whose writing spanned the 20th century. A major reference work of international scope and outstanding scholarship, it has no rival. Many writers included here have never been profiled in a major reference source. Entries for each writer include a critical assessment, concentrating on the Jewish themes or defining characteristics of an author's writing and his or her importance to national or world literature; a biographical overview; a list of selected writings; and extensive suggestions for further reading. Articles are signed, and the "Notes on Contributors" section lists contributors and their academic titles, professional accomplishments, and research interests. The development of Jewish literature draws on, and enriches, world literature in a multitude of languages. "Jewish writing" and "Jewish identity" are broadly interpreted. Five introductory essays set the tone of the volume: "American-Jewish Literature," "British-Jewish Literature," "Hebrew Literature in the 20th Century," "Holocaust Writing," and "Yiddish Writing." It includes title, alphabetical, and chronological indexes. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All collections. L. E. Jorbin Cleveland State University


Table of Contents

Entries include: Allen
Woody
American-Jewish Literature
Auster
Paul ,Babel
Isaac
Bellow
Saul
Brodsky
Joseph
Castel-Bloom
Orly
Cixous
HÃâ©lÃâ¿ne
Cohen
Leonard
Doctorow
Edgar L
Durlacher
Gerard
Dworkin
Andrea
Ehrenburg
Ilya Grigorevich
Elkin
Stanley
Ezekiel
Nissim
Fainlight
Ruth
Feiffer
Jules
Fierstein
Harvey
Gershon
Karen
Ginsberg
Allen
Gordimer
Nadine
Hebrew Literature
Heller
Joseph
Holocaust
Writing
Ignatow
David
Ionesco
EugÃâ¿ne
Jacob
Max
Jong
Erica
Josipovici
Gabriel
Kafka
Franz
KertÃâ©sz
Imre
KonrÃâÂíd
GyÃâ¶rgy
Langer
Jiri
Levi
Primo
Lustig
ArnoÃâ¶t
Mailer
Norman
Mamet
David
Miller
Arthur
Nadas
Peter
Nathanson
Henri
Nemerov
Howard
Odets
Clifford
Ortiz
Alicia
Dujovne
Oz
Amos
Paley
Grace
Pasternak
Boris
Potok
Chaim
Proust
Marcel
Raab
Esther
Roth
Philip
Rukeyser
Muriel
Sendak
Maurice
Simon
Neil
Stein
Gertrude
Tchernikowsky
Shaul
Trilling
Lionel
Tuwim
Julian
Uris
Leon
Viertel
Berthold
Vigee
Claude
Vogel
David
West
Nathanael
Wiesel
Elie
Wouk
Herman
Yehoshua, A.B.
Yezierska
Anzia
Yiddish Writing in the 20th Century
Zach
Nathan
Zukofsky
Louis
Zwicky
Fay