Cover image for Flying high : JetBlue founder and CEO David Neeleman's beats the competition-- even in the world's most turbulent industry
Title:
Flying high : JetBlue founder and CEO David Neeleman's beats the competition-- even in the world's most turbulent industry
Author:
Wynbrandt, James.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Hoboken, N.J. : Wiley, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
vi, 298 pages: 24 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
The journey begins -- Have I got a deal for you -- Morris Air spreads its wings -- Off to Southwest -- Opening up new skies -- A different kind of airline -- Preparing for departure -- JetBlue takes flight -- Making air travel entertaining -- Keeping customers happy -- The technology advantage -- Getting the word out in style -- Dealing with disaster -- Preserving the culture -- Looking to the future -- David Neeleman's rules for succeeding in any business.
Personal Subject:
Corporate Subject:
ISBN:
9780471655442
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Flying High traces the incredible career of the founder and chairman of JetBlue, David Neeleman, from his teenage ventures and beginnings in the travel industry., to his short stint at Southwest Airlines and the ultimate launch of JetBlue. In a series of interviews with Neeleman′s friends, associates, and high-ranking officials in both business and aviation, this books tells the store of Neeleman and explores the rules of success he both lives and builds his companies by.


Author Notes

James Wynbrandt is a New York-based author and award-winning aviation and business reporter. He is a regular contributor to numerous high-profile aviation publications, including Smithsonian Air and Space, Plane & Pilot, General Aviation News, Avionics News, and Pilot Journal.


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

As the founder by the age of 40 of three successful discount airline companies?most recently the billion-dollar JetBlue?David Neeleman and his story deserves in-depth analysis. Unfortunately, this largely uncritical profile doesn?t provide that. Veteran aviation and business writer Wynbrandt presents Neeleman?s life in a lively and highly readable style. The first half lays out the details of Neeleman?s major successes: turning the small leisure business Morris Travel into a national air charter by developing the concept of ticketless reservations, which Wynbrandt correctly claims ?would forever revolutionize airline bookings,? and brokering a deal with Southwest Airlines, which purchased Morris and then cut Neeleman loose. But the bulk of the book describes the development and success of JetBlue and presents a superficial look at some extremely troubling aspects of Neeleman?s business philosophy, such as his disdain for unions (?I think they did a great thing for our country at a certain time?) and his allowing JetBlue to share records of five million passenger transactions (a violation of its own privacy policy) with an army contract company working on post-9/11 security problems, a decision Wynbrandt too easily explains as a product of Neeleman?s Mormon-based ?respect for patriarchal authority.? (July) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.


Table of Contents

Introductionp. 1
Chapter 1 The Journey Beginsp. 7
Chapter 2 Have I Got a Deal for Youp. 23
Chapter 3 Morris Air Spreads Its Wingsp. 39
Chapter 4 Off to Southwestp. 55
Chapter 5 Opening Up New Skiesp. 73
Chapter 6 A Different Kind of Airlinep. 85
Chapter 7 Preparing for Departurep. 103
Chapter 8 JetBlue Takes Flightp. 121
Chapter 9 Making Air Travel Entertainingp. 139
Chapter 10 Keeping Customers Happyp. 151
Chapter 11 The Technology Advantagep. 163
Chapter 12 Getting the Word Out in Stylep. 177
Chapter 13 Dealing with Disasterp. 193
Chapter 14 Preserving the Culturep. 213
Chapter 15 Looking to the Futurep. 225
Chapter 16 David Neeleman's Rules for Succeeding in Any Businessp. 243
JetBlue Timelinep. 255
Acknowledgmentsp. 263
Notesp. 265
Indexp. 289