Cover image for Children of the movement : the sons and daughters of Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, Elijah Muhammad, George Wallace, Andrew Young, Julian Bond, Stokely Carmichael, Bob Moses, James Chaney, Elaine Brown, and others reveal how the civil rights movement tested and transformed their families
Title:
Children of the movement : the sons and daughters of Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, Elijah Muhammad, George Wallace, Andrew Young, Julian Bond, Stokely Carmichael, Bob Moses, James Chaney, Elaine Brown, and others reveal how the civil rights movement tested and transformed their families
Author:
Blake, John.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Chicago : Lawrence Hill Books, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
xii, 260 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781556525377
Format :
Book

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E185.96 .B5645 2004 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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E185.96 .B5645 2004 Adult Non-Fiction Black History Non-Circ
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E185.96 .B5645 2004 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Profiling 24 of the adult children of the most recognizable figures in the civil rights movement, this book collects the intimate, moving stories of families who were pulled apart by the horrors of the struggle or brought together by their efforts to change America. The whole range of players is covered, from the children of leading figures like Martin Luther King Jr. and martyrs like James Earl Chaney to segregationists like George Wallace and Black Panther leaders like Elaine Brown. The essays reveal that some children are more pessimistic than their parents, whose idealism they saw destroyed by the struggle, while others are still trying to change the world. Included are such inspiring stories as the daughter of a notoriously racist Southern governor who finds her calling as a teacher in an all-black inner-city school and the daughter of a famous martyr who unexpectedly meets her mother's killer. From the first activists killed by racist Southerners to the current global justice protestors carrying on the work of their parents, these profiles offer a look behind the public face of the triumphant civil rights movement and show the individual lives it changed in surprising ways.


Author Notes

John Blake is a reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, for which he has written several award-winning stories on civil rights. He has received feature-writing awards from the Associated Press, the Georgia Press Association, the Atlanta Association of Black Journalists, and the Society of Professional Journalists


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Newspaper reporter Blake examines the relationships between well-known civil rights activists and their sons and daughters in this revealing look at how the movement affected the personal lives of activists and the legacy inherited by their children. Blake profiles 24 children of activists, as well as some of their parents, many of whom were left deflated after their activist experience and unable to get their bearings in life. Among the subjects are the children of iconic figures Martin Luther King Jr and Malcolm X, as well as the children of Elijah Muhammad, Andrew Young, Julian Bond, Stokely Carmichael, Bob Moses, James Chaney, and Elaine Brown. These revealing portraits show some parents as emotionally and professionally adrift after the movement, distant or overly demanding of their children. Among the offspring, some recount the overwhelming expectations placed on them, and many are less idealistic about changing the world. Blake also includes triumphant portraits of parents and offspring who have survived the traumatic stress of the movement and continue a tradition of idealism and activism. --Vanessa Bush Copyright 2004 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

While most people contemplate civil rights struggles in the ?past tense,? this is a luxury that offspring of the era?s famous names cannot afford, says Blake, an Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter. The author spent two years tracking down the adult sons and daughters of the iconic leaders, lesser-known lieutenants, valiant activists and arch segregationists for these 24 brief, often emotional, occasionally predictable profiles. A few of the civil rights movement?s second generation writhe under the weight of history, while others thrive on self-forged paths. For the sons of Martin Luther King Jr. and Kwame Ture (Stokely Carmichael), the personal is always political as they confront unrelenting pressures to carry on their fathers? monumental works. The biracial daughters of Reverend James Bevel, an influential sit-in leader and protest organizer, bemoan their absentee father, a civil rights ?Daddy Dearest? who ?speaks in political theory all the time? and lambastes interracial relationships. Blake excels at uncovering the questions gnawing at his subjects. George Wallace?s daughter wonders, ?How do you explain your father to your own son?? The child of Black Panther Party leader Elaine Brown asks, ?What do you do when the revolution never comes?? Blake does not, however, attempt to answer these nagging questions. The final chapter, on ?The New Radicals??the anti-globalization leaders who claim inspiration from their parents? activism?presents a problematic coda. A mostly-white movement with global aims, this movement?s battle in Seattle fails to rouse the same passion as earlier struggles in Selma and Atlanta. However, this slight diversion does not upstage an otherwise insightful study of civil rights figures through the eyes and lives of their children. 65 b & w photos (May 15) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.


Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introductionp. ix
1 Casualties of Warp. 1
Chevara Orrin and Bacardi Jackson, daughters of Reverend James Bevel, a Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) leader and member of Martin Luther King Jr.'s inner circlep. 3
Chaka Forman, son of James Forman Sr., former executive director of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC)p. 15
Mary Brown, daughter of James Zwerg, a Freedom Riderp. 25
Maisha Moses, daughter of Bob Moses, a SNCC leader and founder of the Algebra Projectp. 37
2 The Next Generationp. 47
Ralph David Abernathy III, son of Ralph David Abernathy Sr., cofounder of the SCLC and a confidant of Reverend Kingp. 49
Michael Julian Bond, son of Julian Bond, a leader in the SNCC and the NAACPp. 58
James Forman Jr., son of James Forman Sr., former executive director of the SNCCp. 68
Julie Guyot, daughter of Lawrence Guyot Sr., a SNCC field secretaryp. 76
Andrew "Bo" Young III, son of Andrew Young, a SCLC leader and member of Reverend King's inner circlep. 84
3 Children of the Iconsp. 93
Martin Luther King III, son of Reverend Martin Luther King Jr.p. 95
Ilyasah Shabazz, daughter of Malcolm Xp. 108
4 Children of the Segregationist Leadersp. 119
Peggy Wallace Kennedy, daughter of former Alabama Governor George Wallacep. 121
Ouida Barnett Atkins, daughter of former Mississippi Governor Ross Barnett Sr.p. 131
Stephen Smitherman, son of former Selma mayor Joe Smithermanp. 143
5 Children of Black Powerp. 153
Bokar Ture, son of Kwame Ture (Stokely Carmichael), a SNCC and Black Panther Party leaderp. 155
Ericka Abram, daughter of Elaine Brown, former chairwoman of the Black Panther Partyp. 166
Warith Deen Muhammad, son of Elijah Muhammad, founder of the Nation of Islamp. 180
6 Children of the Martyrsp. 193
Penny Liuzzo Herrington, daughter of Viola Liuzzo, who was killed during the Selma campaignp. 195
Ben Chaney and Angela Lewis, brother and daughter of James Earl Chaney, one of three civil rights workers killed during Mississippi Freedom Summerp. 206
Anne Reeb, daughter of Reverend James Reeb, who was killed in Selmap. 217
7 The New Radicals: From Selma to Seattlep. 227
Andrew "Drew" Dellinger, son of Walter Dellinger, a civil rights activist and constitutional law scholarp. 230
Naomi Klein, daughter of Bonnie Sherr Klein, a former member of the Congress for Racial Equality (CORE), and Michael Klein, an antiwar demonstratorp. 238
Timi Gerson, daughter of Bill Gerson, a leader in the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS)p. 248
Indexp. 256