Cover image for Jack the Ripper : the American connection : includes the diaries of James Maybrick
Title:
Jack the Ripper : the American connection : includes the diaries of James Maybrick
Author:
Harrison, Shirley, 1935-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
London : Blake Pub., [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
xxi, 426 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm
General Note:
"The chilling confessions of James Maybrick"--Spine.

"Sensational new evidence of eight Ripper murders in the USA revealed for the first time"--Cover.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781857825909
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Material Type
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HV6535.G6 L65423 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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HV6535.G6 L65423 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

When the diaries of James Maybrick a Liverpool trader were unearthed the last piece in a puzzle over 100 years old was in place. The event made front page headlines, international debate and the strongest evidence yet as to the true identity of Jack the Ripper. This text is a journey back to the scene and execution of what may well be the most infamous spate of murders in history.


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

A decade ago, in The Diary of Jack the Ripper, Harrison identified Liverpool cotton merchant James Maybrick as the author of a confessional diary signed Jack the Ripper. Now she attempts to link the Ripper with earlier killings in the U.S., following the lead of R. Michael Gordon in The American Murders of Jack the Ripper (2003). The diary's authenticity has been the subject of heated debate, but Harrison does little here to persuade, failing to acknowledge that proof Maybrick wrote the diary is not tantamount to proof he was the Ripper. Harrison devotes pages to an astrologer's study, and merely states that Maybrick could have been in Texas in 1885 at the time of multiple slayings there. This claim is at odds with the diary's suggestion that its author had committed just one murder, in Manchester, before the 1888 autumn of terror in London. In addition, Harrison provides scant details on the unsolved Texas murders treated with more care in Steven Saylor's novel A Twist at the End (2000), and which will be the subject of a forthcoming nonfiction treatment, The Midnight Assassin, by Skip Hollandsworth. As psychologist David Canter concludes in his postscript, "The only thing that is certain is that the question of who exactly was Jack the Ripper will not go away." (Apr. 1) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.


Table of Contents

David Canter
Acknowledgementsp. IX
Introductionp. XVII
1 Perhaps in my Tormented Mind I Wish for Someone to Read This and Understandp. 1
2 I am Jack. A Watch is Discoveredp. 23
3 They Will Suffer Just as I. I Will See to Thatp. 35
4 My Hands are Cold, My Heart I Do Believe is Colder Stillp. 47
5 The American Connectionp. 71
6 A Dark Shadow Lays Over the House, it is Evilp. 79
7 There are Times When I Feel an Overwhelming Compulsion to Place my Thoughts to Paperp. 97
8 Tomorrow I Will Purchase the Finest Knife Money Can Buy, Nothing Shall be too Good for my Whoresp. 111
9 I Look Forward to Tomorrow Night's Work, it Will do me Good, a Great Deal of Goodp. 121
10 To my astonishment, I Cannot believe I Have Not Been Caughtp. 133
11 Before I am Finished all England Will Know the Name I Have Given Myselfp. 143
12 God Placed me Here to Kill all Whoresp. 163
13 When I have finished my Fiendish Deeds, the Devil Himself will Praise mep. 179
14 I do Not Know if she has the Strength to Kill mep. 199
15 I Place This Now in a Place Where it Shall be Foundp. 215
16 The Whore Will Suffer Unlike She has Ever Sufferedp. 229
17 My Campaign is Far From Over Yet...p. 249
18 The Pain is Unbearablep. 261
19 I Am Tired of Keeping up the Pretencep. 279
20 The Man I have Become Was Not the Man I Was Bornp. 293
21 Am I Not Indeed a Clever Fellow?p. 305
22 Sir Jim Will Give Nothing Away, Nothingp. 331
23 I Pray Whoever Should Read This Will Find it in Their Heart to Forgive mep. 351
A Facsimile of the Diary of Jack the Ripperp. 357
A Transcript of the Diary of Jack the Ripperp. 391
Postscriptp. 413