Cover image for Les roseaux sauvages Wild reeds
Title:
Les roseaux sauvages Wild reeds
Author:
Techiné, André.
Edition:
[DVD version].
Publication Information:
New York, NY : Fox Lorber Home Video ; [Los Angeles, Calif.] : Strand Releasing, [1997]

©1997
Physical Description:
1 videodisc (110 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in.
Summary:
A poignant coming-of-age story set in southwest France in 1962. Sensitive young François is uncertain of his sexuality as he finds himself more attracted to his classmate Serge than to his platonic girlfriend Maïté. An older boy, Henri, is drawn into the circle, further complicating relationships. Through their passage into adulthood, the four experience a series of sexual and political conflicts as they explore the mysteries of the human heart.
General Note:
Includes interactive menus, production notes, biographies, scene access, and theatrical trailer.

Originally released as a motion picture in 1994.

For specific features see interactive menu.
Language:
French

English
Reading Level:
Not rated.
ISBN:
9781572522176
UPC:
720917050065
Format :
DVD

Available:*

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Material Type
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Status
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DVD 8033 Adult DVD Media Room-Foreign Language Video
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DVD 8033 Adult DVD Foreign Language
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On Order

Summary

Summary

This is a nostalgic French coming-of-age drama from director Andre Techine set in a Provence deeply divided over the war for independence being waged against French colonialism in Algeria. In 1962, Francois (Gael Morel) and Maite (Elodie Bouchez) are best friends and students at a boarding school in southwestern France, where Maite's mother Madame Alvarez (Michele Moretti) is an instructor. Francois is realizing he's gay because of his attraction to his working class roommate Serge (Stephane Rideau). Although Serge seduces Francois one night, he is not gay and is actually attracted to Maite. So is Henri (Frederic Gorny), a radically-politicized Algerian-born Frenchman who supports France in the war, an unpopular position, particularly with Madame Alvarez, a communist. The classroom sparring between Henri and Alvarez galvanizes the school, but then word comes that Serge's older brother has been killed in the war. Madame Alvarez, who loved him but refused to help him desert the military, becomes so unhinged that she must be sent away for treatment. Wild Reeds (1994) won four Cesars (France's equivalent of the Oscar), including the award for that year's Best Picture, beating such other notable films as Red (1994) and Queen Margot (1994). ~ Karl Williams, Rovi