Cover image for Religion and community
Title:
Religion and community
Author:
Ward, Keith, 1938-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Oxford : Clarendon Press ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2000.
Physical Description:
366 pages ; 23 cm
Summary:
Explores the relationship between religion and society, and discusses the ways in which the major world religions need to adapt to the modern world. Keith Ward looks at different forms of religious community, then proposes a radical vision of the church as a person-affirming, world-transforming society within the emerging global community.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780198752585

9780198752592
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Religion is an important social force, both for good and evil, in the modern world. In the final volume of his comparative theology, Keith Ward considers the main ways in which religion and society interact, and the ways in which the major world religions need to adapt themselves in the modernworld. These religions are examined as forms of social life, ranging from communities which seek to renounce the world, to those which seek to embody the laws of God in society, those which see religions in critical dialogue with social structures, and those which see religion as a primarilyindividual matter. The ideas of eretz Yisrael, the umma of Islam, the Buddhist sangha, the Christian church, and the Hindu sampradaya are critically analysed. Ward also considers the doctrine of the church in Aquinas, Calvin, Schleiermacher, and Tillich, and develops a view of the church in a global perspective bymeans of both a historical and thematic approach. He proposes a radical vision of the church as a person-affirming, world-transforming society in the emerging global community of many faiths and cultures. The relation of religious belief and morality, and the ambiguous role of religion in society, is investigated, and the need for a new religious paradigm is defended, expressing a global perspective without insistence on uniformity.


Author Notes

Keith Ward is at University of Oxford.


Table of Contents

Introduction
Part 1 Religious Communities in the World
1 Judaism and the Nation of Israel
2 Islam and the Universal Umma
3 Buddhism and the Sangha
4 Hinduism and the Sampradaya
5 The Secular State
Part 2 The Church as a Spiritual Community
6 The Church as a Teaching Community
7 The Church as a Charismatic Community
8 The Church as a Sacramental Community
9 The Church as a Moral Community
Part 3 The Church in Historical Perspective
10 Orthodox and Catholic Traditions
11 The Reformed Tradition
12 The Post-Enlightenment Tradition
13 The Meaning of History
14 Christian Theology in a Comparative Context
Author Index
Subject Index