Cover image for Un condamné à mort s'est échappé, ou, Le vent souffle où il vent A man escaped
Title:
Un condamné à mort s'est échappé, ou, Le vent souffle où il vent A man escaped
Author:
Poiré, Alain.
Edition:
(DVD version).
Publication Information:
New York, NY : New Yorker Video, [2004]

©1956
Physical Description:
1 videodisc (approximately 100 min.) : sound, black and white ; 4 3/4 in.
Summary:
A French Resistance fighter is sent to an infamous prison in Lyon in 1943, where 7,000 of the 12,000 prisoners housed there died either by natural means or by execution. Lt. Fontaine is certain that execution awaits him, and begins planning his escape. For a period of time he goes it alone, but reluctantly takes on a partner. He gets some help from a couple of prisoners allowed to stroll in the exercise yard, but for the most part he is a figure of isolation.
General Note:
Originally released as a motion picture in 1956.

Based on the memoir written by André Devigny.

Special features: original theatrical trailer.
Language:
French
Reading Level:
MPAA rating: Not rated.
ISBN:
9781567303513
UPC:
717119162443
Format :
DVD

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
DVD 7980 Adult DVD Foreign Language
Searching...
Searching...
DVD 7980 Adult DVD Foreign Language
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

In a genre crowded with quality films, director Robert Bresson's POW drama has become legendary, in part because it strips down the experience of a man desperate to escape to the essentials. That's in keeping with the approach Bresson took with all of his films. The filmmaker, who spent a year in a German prison camp during World War II, based this story on the experiences of Andre Devigny, a French Resistance fighter sent in 1943 to the infamous prison in Lyons, where 7,000 of the 10,000 prisoners housed there died either by natural means or by execution. Lt. Fontaine (Francois Leterrier) is certain that execution awaits him, and he almost immediately begins planning his escape, using homemade tools and an ingenuity for detecting the few weaknesses in the prison's structure and routine. For a time, he goes it alone, then takes on a partner, but only reluctantly. Fontaine does get some help from a couple of prisoners allowed to stroll in the exercise yard, but for the most part he is a figure in isolation. For Bresson, the process of escape is all, and in simplifying his narrative he ratchets up the tension, creating a film story of survival that many feel is without peer. ~ Tom Wiener, Rovi


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

A French resistance fighter (Francois Leterrier) determined to break out of jail executes a careful escape plan complicated by a new cell mate who may be an informer. Minimalist Robert Bresson (Pickpocket; Diary of a Country Priest) studiously shuns conventional dramatic techniques in favor of an austere style: close-ups detailing mundane action, miserly music but meticulous use of sound, and performances minus a hint of acting. Patient viewers will be rewarded with a surprisingly suspenseful jailbreak picture. (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.