Cover image for What's happening to grandpa?
Title:
What's happening to grandpa?
Author:
Shriver, Maria.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Boston : Little, Brown/Warner Books, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 20 cm
Summary:
Kate has always adored her grandpa's storytelling - but lately he's been repeating the same stories again and again. One day he even forgets Kate's name. Her mother's patient explanations open Kate's eyes to what so many of the elderly must confront: Alzheimer's disease and other forms of memory loss. With special insight derived from her own father's struggle with Alzheimer's, Maria Shriver offers a touching and optimistic story that encourages awareness, acceptance, and dialogue among family and friends.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 4.7 0.5 78691.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780316001014
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Maria Shriver presents a timely, touching story that inspires, guides, and educates--and encourages readers to open their eyes to the memories and the love that our elderly loved ones have to offer.

Kate has always adored her grandpa's storytelling, but lately he's been repeating the same stories again and again. One day, he even forgets Kate's name. Her mother's patient explanations open Kate's eyes to what so many of the elderly must confront: Alzheimer's disease and other forms of memory loss. Determined to support her grandfather, Kate explores ways to help him--and herself--cope by creating a photo album of their times together, memories that will remain in their hearts forever.


Author Notes

Maria Shriver was born Maria Owings Shriver on November 6. 1955, in Chicago. She is the second child of the politician Sargent Shriver and Eunice Kennedy Shriver. She is also the niece of U.S. President John F. Kennedy.

She is a journalist who received a Peabody Award and co-anchored the NBC Emmy winning coverage of the 1988 Summer Olympics. She also won two Emmy Awards as executive producer of "The Alzheimer's Project". This special also earned her an Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Award for developing a television show with a conscience.

Maria Shriver earned her Bachelor of Arts Degree in American Studies from Gerogetown University in 1977. She wanted to focus on writing with her book, "Ten Things I Wish I'd Known Before I Went Out into the Real World". She discovered her passion for broadcast journalism while working on her father's vice presidential campaign and sitting with the press corps. She moved on to co-anchor the CBS Morning News with Forest Sawyer. She also began contributing to other news shows such as Dateline NBC.

With her marriage to Arnold Schwarzenegger, she became the First Lady of California in 2003, when he was elected governor. Maria Shriver is a strong advocate for Special Olympics and sits on their Interantional Board. Her book title's include: What's Wrong with Timmy?, What's Happening to Grandpa?, And One More Thing Before You Go . . ., and I've Been Thinking. . . Reflections, Prayers, and Meditations for a Meaningful Life.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Reviewed with Roberta Karim's Faraway Grandpa0 . PreS-Gr.3. Written from a child's viewpoint, these two picture books tell the story of a beloved grandfather with Alzheimer's disease. In Faraway Grandpa0 , set nearly a century ago, Kathleen visits her Grandpa Danny every summer, and they have uproarious fun together. He loves shenanigans, he teases her, and together they bellow out his song from Ireland, "Danny Boy." But one year, he forgets that she's coming, and eventually he comes to live with her family. He hides in her closets and does other silly things. He makes trouble with the neighbors, and he even forgets her name. But he remembers things from long ago, and always, he and Kathleen share the melancholy song. The old-fashioned setting distances the story, but it also shows that the illness is not new. In Rand's warm, pencil-and-watercolor paintings and Karim's short, unrhymed lines the quiet scenarios of hurt and humiliation and heartfelt love tell the truth. In contrast, Shriver's characters are absolutely perfect, and her scenarios are pure bliss. Gushy words and misty pastel illustrations depict family members across three generations as unfailingly kind, strong, and understanding. Young Kate is "curious, sensitive, and wise beyond her age," and Grandpa had an "absolutely happy" life. Yet how supportive is this scenario when a child trying to cope with a beloved, ailing grandparent feels (and sees family members feeling) irritation, anger, and guilt? There will be many requests for this; it has been widely promoted and endorsed by Nancy Reagan. But the purposive story isn't what works; it's the information woven into the fiction. The clear facts about the disease, what to expect (Will Mom get it? Will Kate?), and how to cope are supported by an excellent list of resources and organizations to contact. --Hazel Rochman Copyright 2004 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Kate, first introduced in the bestselling What's Heaven?, struggles to understand her grandfather's symptoms of Alzheimer's in this third collaboration from Shriver and Speidel. Here journalist Shriver not only uses the narrative to model a potentially prickly conversation between parent and child (as she did with What's Wrong with Timmy?) but also conveys a challenging conversation in which Kate tells her friends of her grandfather's condition (to explain why she wants to spend Sunday with him instead of them). Speidel's soft pastel portraits reinforce the loving ties among family members. Shriver's succinct explanation of the condition ("It's a disease of the brain that some people get when they're older. It affects Grandpa's memory and makes him confused, irritated, and often angry because he's struggling to remember things he just did," Kate's mother tells her daughter), the examples of conversations that could easily be emulated by adults and children, as well as Kate's loving project (undertaken with her grandfather) to put together a photo album to preserve her grandfather's memories and to help him remember family and friends, make this a book that will appeal to an audience across generations. Ages 6-9. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 4-Shriver walks a girl through acceptance and a beginning understanding of her Grandpa's condition. Kate questions not just what can be done to address the changes Alzheimer's will bring within her own family but she also tries to place her concern in the larger context of growing old. She decides how to help her grandfather as he goes through this difficult time. Together they sit down with a box of photographs and his still-intact memories and create a scrapbook. This well-meaning book is clearly and lovingly written. Kate is admittedly "wise beyond her age," which serves the author well as the child becomes the voice of reason. Grandpa is known to talk to God and is grateful for having been granted a good life despite his current adversity. The book is squat and square, helping to establish intimacy. There is a soft focus to the pastel art that matches the tone of the story. The application of color is lively, scratchy yet self-contained, giving a sense of controlled movement. The art is especially effective at giving Grandpa energy and verve. Certain phrases are printed in a larger type on each page, giving multiple entries into the book's key concepts simply by reading these emphasized statements. As Grandpa says, "the important memories of my life will forever be in my heart." It's a warm and touching thought.-Martha Topol, Traverse Area District Library, Traverse City, MI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.