Cover image for The cat's pajamas : stories
Title:
The cat's pajamas : stories
Author:
Bradbury, Ray, 1920-2012.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Morrow, [2004]

©2004
Physical Description:
xix, 234 pages ; 22 cm
Summary:
A collection of new short stories by the award-winning science-fiction writer of One More for the Road includes tales of twentieth-century rural life, Halloween terrors, and flights of fancy on Martian shores. Ray Bradbury is, indisputably, one of America's greatest storytellers. The recipient of the 2000 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters, he ranks among the most beloved, and widely read, of American authors. In The Cat's Pajamas, this "latter-day O. Henry" (Booklist) takes us on an amazing walk through his six-decade career, presenting twenty-two tales, some old, some new, all but two never before published. Here you will find stories strange and scary, nostalgic and bittersweet, humorous and heart-touching, ranging from the not-so-long-gone past to an unknowable future: a group of senators drinks a bit too much, and gambles away the United States; a newlywed couple buys an old house and finds their fledgling relationship tested; two mysterious strangers arrive at a rooming house and baffle their fellow occupants with strange crying in the night; a lonely woman takes a last chance on love. The final piece in the collection is a story-poem, a fond salute from Bradbury to his literary heroes Shaw, Chesterton, Dickens, Twain, Poe, Wilde, Melville, and Kipling. The Cat's Pajamas is just that, the bee's knees, a touching, timeless, and tender collection from the incomparable Ray Bradbury, and a anoramic view of an amazingly long, rich, and fertile creative career.
Language:
English
Contents:
Chrysalis -- The island -- Sometime before dawn -- Hail to the chief -- We'll just act natural -- Olé, Orozco! Siqueiros, sí! -- The house -- The John Wilkes Booth/Warner Brothers/MGM/NBC funeral train -- A careful man dies -- The cat's pajamas -- The Mafioso cement-mixing machine -- The ghosts -- Where's my hat, what's my hurry? -- The transformation -- Sixty-six -- A matter of taste -- I get the blues when it rains (A remembrance) -- All my enemies are dead -- The completist -- The R.B., G.K.C., and G.B.S. forever orient express.
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9780060585655
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Ray Bradbury is, indisputably, one of America's greatest storytellers. The recipient of the 2000 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters, he ranks among the most beloved -- and widely read -- of American authors. In The Cat's Pajamas, this "latter-day O. Henry" (Booklist) takes us on an amazing walk through his six-decade career, presenting twenty-two tales -- some old, some new, all but two never before published.

Here you will find stories strange and scary, nostalgic and bittersweet, humorous and heart-touching, ranging from the not-so-long-gone past to an unknowable future: a group of senators drinks a bit too much -- and gambles away the United States; a newlywed couple buys an old house and finds their fledgling relationship tested; two mysterious strangers arrive at a rooming house and baffle their fellow occupants with strange crying in the night; a lonely woman takes a last chance on love. The final piece in the collection is a story-poem, a fond salute from Bradbury to his literary heroes Shaw, Chesterton, Dickens, Twain, Poe, Wilde, Melville, and Kipling.

The Cat's Pajamas is just that -- the bee's knees -- a touching, timeless, and tender collection from the incomparable Ray Bradbury, and a anoramic view of an amazingly long, rich, and fertile creative career.


Author Notes

Ray Bradbury was born in Waukegan, Illinois on August 22, 1920. At the age of fifteen, he started submitting short stories to national magazines. During his lifetime, he wrote more than 600 stories, poems, essays, plays, films, television plays, radio, music, and comic books. His books include The Martian Chronicles, Fahrenheit 451, The Illustrated Man, Dandelion Wine, Something Wicked This Way Comes, and Bradbury Speaks. He won numerous awards for his works including a World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement in 1977, the 2000 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters, the 2004 National Medal of Arts, and the 2007 Pulitzer Prize Special Citation.

He wrote the screen play for John Huston's classic film adaptation of Moby Dick, and was nominated for an Academy Award. He adapted 65 of his stories for television's The Ray Bradbury Theater, and won an Emmy for his teleplay of The Halloween Tree. The film The Wonderful Ice Cream Suit was written by Ray Bradbury and was based on his story The Magic White Suit.

He was the idea consultant and wrote the basic scenario for the United States pavilion at the 1964 World's Fair, as well as being an imagineer for Walt Disney Enterprises, where he designed the Spaceship Earth exhibition at Walt Disney World's Epcot Center. He died after a long illness on June 5, 2012 at the age of 91.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

The grand old man of American sf and fantasy proffers one more collection of his characteristically brief stories, consisting of about equal parts recent work and previously uncollected late-1940s and 1950s stuff. Old or new, they are remarkably of a piece. Most resemble theatrical sketches; they are shaped toward definite endings or points. In The House, from 1947, a young woman accustomed to haute bourgeois domestic ease is dismayed by her less-pampered husband's choice of a rundown manse for their home--until a friend of his arrives, enthuses, and pitches into setting the place to rights; then the new wife realizes what building a home is all about. In The Completist, dated 2003-04 but set in 1948, a wealthy bibliophile orates about his mania to his shipboard dinner companions but at last reveals the hole in his life that his collecting may be meant to fill. If the obvious forerunners of stories like those, which preponderate here, are O. Henry's neat concoctions, Bradbury's recent penchants for writing almost entirely in dialogue and for ambiguous and unresolved endings make him very contemporary. On the evidence of previous volumes as well as this one, perhaps it is best to consider Bradbury the foremost fabulist of his time, more Aesop than Cheever or Salinger; that is why, even when there is nothing fantastic or futuristic in his stories, they still feel like fantasy and sf--fiction about ought and might more than is. --Ray Olson Copyright 2004 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

The 20 brisk, imaginative tales (18 previously unpublished, with many written in the 1940s and '50s and others as recent as 2003) in Bradbury's latest collection show the astonishingly prolific author in lights of varying favor. Bradbury aims for a moral in "Chrysalis" (1946-1947), when a young black man who's tried for years to bleach his skin and a young white boy with a deep tan get the same racist response from a hot dog vendor. Skin color is also the issue in "The Transformation" (1948-1949), a set piece in which a gang of carnival workers enact revenge on a notorious rapist with the help of a tattoo gun. Standouts among the more fantastical stories include tales of civilized giant alien spiders yearning for Earthly integration; a pair of traumatized time travelers disturbing their nervous neighbor; and a U.S. president trying to reclaim the country after 12 drunk senators gambled it away to an Indian chief (a story that, Bradbury notes in the introduction, he wrote in "a few hours"). Several entries rely on personal paradox: a "freeway graffiti stuntman" becomes famous only after his accidental death in "Ole, Orozco! Siqueiros, Si!" and an unknown intruder terrorizes a family of agoraphobes in "The Island." Alternately thoughtful, whimsical, probing and slapdash, these tales are a mixed bag, but a very interesting one. Agent, Don Congdon. (July 6) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

The subtitle says it all. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Adult/High School-Bradbury's imagination exploits the preposterous with fantasy that offers a window into the human psyche. Stories range from the lighthearted, romantic tug-of-war in the title's namesake to more sinister, stomach-churning fare. Some of the characters are decent, while others are dastardly; they are confused, young, withered, or wily. Each piece has a haunting, Twilight Zone quality. The author's introduction gives readers insight into his thought processes as he reaches into dark recesses, doles out social justice, and bandies about far-out plots like the President of the United States having to win back the country in a card game with American Indians. Unpublished tales from decades ago and those written in the 21st century all carry Bradbury's unmistakable edginess.-Karen Sokol, Fairfax County Public Schools, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.