Cover image for Escapes from slavery
Title:
Escapes from slavery
Author:
Currie, Stephen, 1960-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
San Diego : Lucent Books, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
112 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
Summary:
Narratives of five escapes from slavery, each of which was typical in many ways but featured unusual personal characteristics or circumstances that made these trips to freedom extraordinary.
Language:
English
Contents:
Introduction : fugitive slaves -- Ellen and William Craft -- Josiah Henson -- Harriet Tubman -- William Wells Brown -- Henry Brown.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 7.8 5.0 73583.
ISBN:
9781590182765
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
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E450 .C88 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area-Black History
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E450 .C88 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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E450 .C88 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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E450 .C88 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

With law, society, and geography all firmly against them, the slaves profiled in this book made truly ingenious escapes from their plights. Their stories offer a personal and exciting way to learn about the institution of slavery.


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-9-Of the four million slaves in antebellum America, approximately 60,000 escaped to freedom. This book recounts the story of six of those individuals, all of whom possessed determination, courage, creativity, and hope. Ellen and William Craft ran away from Georgia, traveling by boat and train in plain sight using an elaborate deception. After several harrowing events, they successfully reached Philadelphia on Christmas Day, 1848. Josiah Henson, his wife, and their four children crossed the Ohio River to Cincinnati, eventually reaching Canada with the help of several abolitionists. Harriet Tubman is remembered for the dozens of other slaves she helped to freedom, making several journeys back to the South after her successful escape in 1849. With the help of Quakers, William Wells Brown escaped from Missouri and settled in Ohio, working as a steward aboard a Lake Erie steamboat. A Virginia slave Henry Brown made it to freedom by mailing himself in a large wooden crate to Philadelphia. These exciting tales are written in lively language and are accompanied by black-and-white illustrations and informative sidebars. Facts about the Underground Railroad and its assistance to runaway slaves are appended.-Patricia Ann Owens, Wabash Valley College, Mt. Carmel, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.