Cover image for Life in colonial Boston
Title:
Life in colonial Boston
Author:
Gillis, Jennifer Blizin, 1950-
Publication Information:
Chicago : Heinemann Library, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
32 pages : color illustrations, color maps ; 28 cm.
Summary:
An overview of everyday life in the busy port city of Boston between 1760 and 1773, including the changes that came as colonists began to resent the trade restrictions and taxes imposed upon them by England.
Language:
English
Contents:
Boston begins -- Busy port -- Rich town -- Jobs -- Children -- Schools -- Homes -- Free time -- Clothes -- Food and drink -- Changes in Boston -- Spreading the news -- The Boston Tea Party -- Boston today.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 5.5 0.5 72451.
ISBN:
9781403437952

9781403442840

9781403442826
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
F73.4 .G54 2003 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

This book tells about life in Boston, Massachusetts, from 1760 to 1773. Boston was one of the largest cities in the thirteen colonies of Great Britain. At first, the people who live in Boston copied the way things were done in Britain. But as time passed, they grew unhappy with the fact that they did not make their own laws. By the 1760s, Bostonians felt they were paying too many taxes to Britain. They felt they had no say in how their colony was being run. People began to hold meetings to complain about the taxes and to talk about independence. The Bostonians wanted to be free from Great Britain. We have illustrated the book with paintings and drawings from colonial times and with artists' ideas of how things looked then.


Summary

This book tells about life in Boston, Massachusetts, from 1760 to 1773. Boston was one of the largest cities in the thirteen colonies of Great Britain. At first, the people who live in Boston copied the way things were done in Britain. But as time passed, they grew unhappy with the fact that they did not make their own laws. By the 1760s, Bostonians felt they were paying too many taxes to Britain. They felt they had no say in how their colony was being run. People began to hold meetings to complain about the taxes and to talk about independence. The Bostonians wanted to be free from Great Britain. We have illustrated the book with paintings and drawings from colonial times and with artists' ideas of how things looked then.


Reviews 2

School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-4-Straightforward and easy to read, these books describe various aspects of Colonial life, including work, home, and school, and offer brief, simplified discussions of the political climate of the time. While some historical detail may be glossed over for readability, general outlines are accurate. Amsterdam covers the period 1624-1664 and Boston, 1760-1773. France covers the period 1639-1760 in Canada, Acadia, and Louisiana and deals largely with life in the first of these colonies, the land around the St. Lawrence River Valley. Full spreads focus on particular topics and include sidebars as well as captioned, color and black-and-white illustrations. Helpful maps and time lines at the beginning of the books give context and background to the material that follows. A picture and brief description of the area as it is today offer readers a way to connect the past and present. The writing and content are geared toward the younger end of the spectrum, but some reluctant readers will find these titles helpful and relevant. Similar information is covered in "The Library of the Thirteen Colonies" (PowerKids).-Jody Kopple, Shady Hill School, Cambridge, MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-4-Straightforward and easy to read, these books describe various aspects of Colonial life, including work, home, and school, and offer brief, simplified discussions of the political climate of the time. While some historical detail may be glossed over for readability, general outlines are accurate. Amsterdam covers the period 1624-1664 and Boston, 1760-1773. France covers the period 1639-1760 in Canada, Acadia, and Louisiana and deals largely with life in the first of these colonies, the land around the St. Lawrence River Valley. Full spreads focus on particular topics and include sidebars as well as captioned, color and black-and-white illustrations. Helpful maps and time lines at the beginning of the books give context and background to the material that follows. A picture and brief description of the area as it is today offer readers a way to connect the past and present. The writing and content are geared toward the younger end of the spectrum, but some reluctant readers will find these titles helpful and relevant. Similar information is covered in "The Library of the Thirteen Colonies" (PowerKids).-Jody Kopple, Shady Hill School, Cambridge, MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Boston begins
Busy port
Rich town
Jobs
Children
Schools
Homes
Free time
Clothes
Food and drink
Changes in Boston
Spreading the news
The Boston Tea Party
Boston today
Boston begins
Busy port
Rich town
Jobs
Children
Schools
Homes
Free time
Clothes
Food and drink
Changes in Boston
Spreading the news
The Boston Tea Party
Boston today