Cover image for Music and technoculture
Title:
Music and technoculture
Author:
Lysloff, René T. A.
Publication Information:
Middletown, Conn. : Wesleyan University Press, [2003]

©2003
Physical Description:
x, 395 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
Introduction : Ethnomusicology in the twenty-first century / René T.A. Lysloff and Leslie C. Gay, Jr. -- Musical life in Softcity : an Internet ethnography / René T.A. Lysloff -- A riddle wrapped in a mystery : transnational music sampling and Enigma's "return to innocence" / Timothy D. Taylor -- "Ethnic sounds" : the economy and discourse of world music sampling / Paul Théberge -- Technology and the production of Islamic space : the call to prayer in Singapore / Tong Soon Lee -- Plugged in at home : Vietnamese American technoculture in Orange County / Deborah Wong -- Technology and identity in Colombian popular music : tecno-macondismo in Carlos Vives's approach to Vallenato / Janet L. Sturman -- The nature/technology binary opposition dismantled in the music of Madonna and Björk / Charity Marsh and Melissa West -- Before the deluge : the technoculture of song sheet publishing viewed from late-nineteenth-century Galveston / Leslie G. Gay, Jr. -- Stretched from Manhattan's back alley to MOMA : a social history of magnetic tape and recording / Matthew Malsky -- Tails out : social phenomenology and the ethnographic representation of technology in music making / Thomas G. Porcello -- "There's not a problem I can't fix, 'cause I can do it in the mix" : on the performative technology of 12-inch vinyl / Kai Fikentscher -- Sounds like the Mall of America : programmed music and the architectonics of commercial space / Jonathan Sterne -- Consuming audio : an introduction to tweak theory / Marc Perlman -- Fairly used : Negativland's U2 and the precarious practice of acoustic appropriation / David Sanjek -- Afterword : back to basics with the Roland 303 / Andrew Ross.
ISBN:
9780819565136

9780819565143
Format :
Book

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ML197 .M78 2003 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Moving from web to field, from Victorian parlour to 21st-century mall, the 15 essays gathered here seek to yield new insights regarding the intersection of local culture, musical creativity and technological possibilities. Inspired by the concept of technoculture, the authors locate technology squarely in the middle of expressive culture: they are concerned with how technology culturally informs and infuses aspects of everyday life and musical experience, and they argue that this merger does not necessarily result in a cultural grayout, but instead often produces exciting new possibilities. In this collection, we find evidence of musical practices and ways of knowing music that are informed or even significantly transformed by new technologies, yet remain profoundly local in style and meaning.


Summary

Moving from web to field, from Victorian parlor to 21st-century mall, the 15 essays gathered here yield new insights regarding the intersection of local culture, musical creativity and technological possibilities. Inspired by the concept of "technoculture," the authors locate technology squarely in the middle of expressive culture: they are concerned with how technology culturally informs and infuses aspects of everyday life and musical experience, and they argue that this merger does not necessarily result in a "cultural grayout," but instead often produces exciting new possibilities. In this collection, we find evidence of musical practices and ways of knowing music that are informed or even significantly transformed by new technologies, yet remain profoundly local in style and meaning.

CONTRIBUTORS: Leslie C. Gay, Jr., Kai Fikentscher, Tong Soon Lee, René T. A. Lysloff, Matthew Malsky, Charity Marsh, Marc Perlman, Thomas Porcello, Andrew Ross, David Sanjek, jonathan Sterne, Janet L. Sturman, Timothy D. Taylor, Paul Théberge, Melissa West, Deborah Wong.


Author Notes

RENÉ T.A. LYSLOFF is Assistant Professor of Music at the University of California, Riverside. LESLIE C. GAY, JR. is Associate Professor and Coordinator of Musicology at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. ANDREW ROSS is Director of the American Studies Program at New York University.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

Resulting from a 1995 ethnomusicology meeting, this book includes an introduction to music and technoculture and 14 chapters treating particular aspects of technoculture. This is not the ethnomusicology of the counterculture that flocked to Wesleyan, UCLA, etc. in the 1960s seeking pure musical roots unspoiled by the media, Western hegemony, and "dead white European male composers." Offering a critique of "traditional" ethnomusicology as caught in the traps of "authenticity," "exoticism," and "survivals," Lysloff (Univ. of California, Riverside) and Gay (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville) argue for establishing an ethnomusicology of technoculture--i.e., one exploring "how technology implicates cultural practices involving music." Thus, they focus not on musicians and what they do and think but on the multifarious and changing meanings of technology itself, whether used by researchers or the researched. Without judging the value of technology, they explore ethical implications of devices and media that can be used for good and bad, arguing that meaning results from usage, not from the devices themselves. Some chapters deal with technology alone; others explore technology in relation to particular places (Singapore, the US, Colombia). Not surprisingly, most authors address contemporary (or popular) culture rather than "traditional" culture, the focus of what many now see as "old-fashioned" ethnomusicology. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. T. E. Miller Kent State University


Choice Review

Resulting from a 1995 ethnomusicology meeting, this book includes an introduction to music and technoculture and 14 chapters treating particular aspects of technoculture. This is not the ethnomusicology of the counterculture that flocked to Wesleyan, UCLA, etc. in the 1960s seeking pure musical roots unspoiled by the media, Western hegemony, and "dead white European male composers." Offering a critique of "traditional" ethnomusicology as caught in the traps of "authenticity," "exoticism," and "survivals," Lysloff (Univ. of California, Riverside) and Gay (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville) argue for establishing an ethnomusicology of technoculture--i.e., one exploring "how technology implicates cultural practices involving music." Thus, they focus not on musicians and what they do and think but on the multifarious and changing meanings of technology itself, whether used by researchers or the researched. Without judging the value of technology, they explore ethical implications of devices and media that can be used for good and bad, arguing that meaning results from usage, not from the devices themselves. Some chapters deal with technology alone; others explore technology in relation to particular places (Singapore, the US, Colombia). Not surprisingly, most authors address contemporary (or popular) culture rather than "traditional" culture, the focus of what many now see as "old-fashioned" ethnomusicology. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. T. E. Miller Kent State University


Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Intoduction: Ethnomusicology in the Twenty-first CentureRene T. A. Lysloff and Leslie C. Gay, Jr.
Chapter 2 Musical Life in Softcity: An Internet EthnographyRene T. A. Lysloff
Chapter 3 A Riddle Wrapped in a Mystery: Trnsitional Music Sampling and Enigma's "Return to Innocence"Timothy D. Taylor
Chapter 4 "Ethnic Sounds": The Economy and Discourse of the Wold Music SamplingPaul Theberge
Chapter 5 Technology and the Prayer in SingaporeTong Soon Lee
Chapter 6 Plugged in at Home: Vietnamese American Technoculture in Orange CountyDeborah Wong
Chapter 7 Technology and Identity In Colobian Popular Music:Tecno-macondismo in Carlos Vives's Approach to VallenatoJanet L. Sturman
Chapter 8 The Nature/Technology Binary Opposition Dismantled in the Music of Madonna and BjorkCharity Marsh and Melissa West
Chapter 9 Before the Deluge: The Technoculture of Song-Sheet Publishing Viewed from Late-Niniteenth-Century GavelstonLeslie G. Gay, Jr.
Chapter 10 Stretched from Manhattan's Back Alley to MOMA: A Social History of Magnetic Tape and RecordingMatthew Malsky
Chapter 11 Tails Out: Social Phenomenolgy and the Ethnographic Representation of Technology in Music MakingThomas G. Porcello
Chapter 12 "There's not a problem I can't fix, 'cause I can do it in the mix" : On the Performative Technoloy of 12-Inch VinylKai Fikentscher
Chapter 13 Sounds Like the Mall of America: Programmed Music and the Architectonics of Commercial SpaceJonathan Sterne
Chapter 14 Consuming Audio: An Introduction to Tweak TheoryMarc Perlman
Chapter 15 Fairly Used: Negativeland's U2 and the Precarious Practice of Acoustic AppropriationDavid Sanjek
Afterword: Back to Basics with the RolandAndrew Ross
List of Contributors
Index
Chapter 1 Intoduction: Ethnomusicology in the Twenty-first CentureRene T. A. Lysloff and Leslie C. Gay, Jr.
Chapter 2 Musical Life in Softcity: An Internet EthnographyRene T. A. Lysloff
Chapter 3 A Riddle Wrapped in a Mystery: Trnsitional Music Sampling and Enigma's "Return to Innocence"Timothy D. Taylor
Chapter 4 "Ethnic Sounds": The Economy and Discourse of the Wold Music SamplingPaul Theberge
Chapter 5 Technology and the Prayer in SingaporeTong Soon Lee
Chapter 6 Plugged in at Home: Vietnamese American Technoculture in Orange CountyDeborah Wong
Chapter 7 Technology and Identity In Colobian Popular Music:Tecno-macondismo in Carlos Vives's Approach to VallenatoJanet L. Sturman
Chapter 8 The Nature/Technology Binary Opposition Dismantled in the Music of Madonna and BjorkCharity Marsh and Melissa West
Chapter 9 Before the Deluge: The Technoculture of Song-Sheet Publishing Viewed from Late-Niniteenth-Century GavelstonLeslie G. Gay, Jr.
Chapter 10 Stretched from Manhattan's Back Alley to MOMA: A Social History of Magnetic Tape and RecordingMatthew Malsky
Chapter 11 Tails Out: Social Phenomenolgy and the Ethnographic Representation of Technology in Music MakingThomas G. Porcello
Chapter 12 "There's not a problem I can't fix, 'cause I can do it in the mix" : On the Performative Technoloy of 12-Inch VinylKai Fikentscher
Chapter 13 Sounds Like the Mall of America: Programmed Music and the Architectonics of Commercial SpaceJonathan Sterne
Chapter 14 Consuming Audio: An Introduction to Tweak TheoryMarc Perlman
Chapter 15 Fairly Used: Negativeland's U2 and the Precarious Practice of Acoustic AppropriationDavid Sanjek
Afterword: Back to Basics with the RolandAndrew Ross
List of Contributors
Index